(Topic ID: 246329)

3D printing sharing thread.... Lets better the hobby

By hoby1

3 years ago


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    #2901 8 days ago
    Quoted from taylor34:

    It's loud. Not a quiet printer due to the speed I think

    Joel the 3d printing nerd reviewed it. He likens it to a slow dance for the perimeter and then a crazy jiggle for the infill

    #2902 8 days ago

    First test of the multicolor went well. Did you have bed adhesion issues on yours when you started? Everything on it is top notch, I just need to figure out how to get stuff to stick to the cool plate.

    73F71358-C232-4CE1-A2CB-E4FE6F23635F (resized).jpeg
    #2903 8 days ago
    Quoted from taylor34:

    First test of the multicolor went well. Did you have bed adhesion issues on yours when you started? Everything on it is top notch, I just need to figure out how to get stuff to stick to the cool plate.
    [quoted image]

    The website says to use glue stick which is a little disappointing for this level of printer. I read in a comment somewhere that the glue was actually to help with removal from the plate, not adhesion but that doesn't sound like your problem.

    #2904 8 days ago
    Quoted from taylor34:

    First test of the multicolor went well. Did you have bed adhesion issues on yours when you started? Everything on it is top notch, I just need to figure out how to get stuff to stick to the cool plate.
    [quoted image]

    That print looks great. No adhesion issues getting the prints to stick, just the opposite. Prints stick too well to the cool plate if untreated. The glue stick they suggest to use to allow for easy print removal. I remove The plate and spray it with Aqua Net because it’s so much easier and cleaner than glue stick. I only use that once in awhile for spot applications. I also bought their new textured PEI sheet recently.

    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    Joel the 3d printing nerd reviewed it. He likens it to a slow dance for the perimeter and then a crazy jiggle for the infill

    This is actually the just launching and lower featured P1P and not the X1 which is fully enclosed and prints faster as well as more fully featured.

    #2905 8 days ago

    Hey ya'll, got a question about a print I am working on that has a bevel on the base. I have to print it in this orientation due to other parts of the print that are on top (not shown in picture). This seemed like it would print fine.. and generally it works but I am getting a lot of weird imperfections in the print like places where it's not smooth but little 'pokies' and 'divots' (sorry.. that's the best descriptors I can come up with). Printed the other way, it's all fine.. so it's clearly something with printing it in this orientation with the support material.

    Any thoughts on how to fix this? Temp settings or is there a way the supports are printed? I've always relied on the stock settings in Cura for that and had no issues till now.. I will mention that I am printing this is silver 'silk' PLA.. which I noticed slightly extenuates the texture imperfections vs 'normal' PLA.. dunno if anyone has adjustments they recommend for silk PLA?

    base (resized).JPG

    #2906 8 days ago
    Quoted from Kevin_LHeureux:

    That print looks great. No adhesion issues getting the prints to stick, just the opposite. Prints stick too well to the cool plate if untreated. The glue stick they suggest to use to allow for easy print removal. I remove The plate and spray it with Aqua Net because it’s so much easier and cleaner than glue stick. I only use that once in awhile for spot applications. I also bought their new textured PEI sheet recently.

    This is actually the just launching and lower featured P1P and not the X1 which is fully enclosed and prints faster as well as more fully featured.

    I tried aquanet and that seems to help. I also tried turning up the heat but that didn’t help, on my qidi and Prusa I have to crank the bed temp to get pla to stick, otherwise it wants to start to pull off 1/2 way through my 8 hour print. It might just be my overture or hatchbox filament, it appears like the Bambu filament sticks much better.

    #2907 8 days ago
    Quoted from Mbecker:

    Hey ya'll, got a question about a print I am working on that has a bevel on the base. I have to print it in this orientation due to other parts of the print that are on top (not shown in picture). This seemed like it would print fine.. and generally it works but I am getting a lot of weird imperfections in the print like places where it's not smooth but little 'pokies' and 'divots' (sorry.. that's the best descriptors I can come up with). Printed the other way, it's all fine.. so it's clearly something with printing it in this orientation with the support material.
    Any thoughts on how to fix this? Temp settings or is there a way the supports are printed? I've always relied on the stock settings in Cura for that and had no issues till now.. I will mention that I am printing this is silver 'silk' PLA.. which I noticed slightly extenuates the texture imperfections vs 'normal' PLA.. dunno if anyone has adjustments they recommend for silk PLA?
    [quoted image]

    "Accentuates"?

    Anyway...

    I was pleasantly surprised to find that even though I didn't see mention in the release notes, I have a lot more success with supports in PrusaSlicer 2.5.0 than I did with the previous version. I think there might have been some tweaks to profiles or something. I've taken to using "snug" for everything and it's been working great; very little scarring, and the supports pull right off. I'm mainly printing PETG, but might be similar improvements with PLA.

    So maybe try a newer slicer.

    More generally, the symptoms you describe (hard to know without seeing the print in person, or even a photo) sound like under-extrusion, or possible moisture in the filament. If the filament has been out of its packaging for awhile, it might need drying. I just stick my filament in the oven at 60-70 C (140-160 F) for 4-6 hours. I lay it on aluminum foil, on top of an old baking sheet, but honestly there's never seemed to be any risk of melting, fumes, etc. at that temp.

    If it's not a moisture problem, maybe try bumping up the nozzle temp in 5 C increments, until you get to the max temp specified for the filament. With PETG, this would lead to excessive stringing, but I think with PLA, if you're not already near the max, you can safely go higher to see if it fixes the issue.

    #2908 7 days ago

    By the way, here's the pinball stuff I've made. Two I made for my Rush machine specifically, though one of those parts should work with any modern Stern machine. Those are a part to install on the playfield to fix the problem with the inner loop roll-over switch not registering the ball, and a replacement for the speaker mounting plate, to let me put 5.25" speakers in the machine.

    The third design works with any pin: it's a foot rest, which I use in conjunction with furniture sliders. I made a short one, useful just for distributing the weight of the leveler foot over the foam pad of the slider so it doesn't just squash down into my carpet, along with a taller one, which does the same thing but also adds 1" of height to the foot instead of just 1/4". I use this to help level my pins without having to extend the leveler all the way out, or in the case of my TZ, to raise the whole machine up after dropping the front of the machine by using the upper pair of mounting holes for the leg.

    The foot rest was obviously pretty simple to make, but I still really like it, the way it fits the sliders and the pin's foot just right, and directly solves the problems I had with both.

    If anyone's interested, they can take a look at my collections on Printables and Thingiverse:
    https://www.printables.com/social/375277-peted/collections/331598
    https://www.thingiverse.com/pete-d/collections/pinball

    Rush inner loop fix
    Stern 5.25" speaker mount plate
    Pinball leveler foot lift

    #2909 7 days ago

    After years of using Ender 3s " and I still love them" I am going to give the Prusa MK3S+ a try.

    I was going to upgrade to a Sprite extruder and a new motherboard but said what the heck.

    It's 799 with no back order right now for the kit..... plus the Black Friday deal of free shipping, free roll of orange PETG, 10 coupon , and extra textured sheet. Saves about 160 bucks from the order.

    I really think it will be a solid machine with the direct drive and their slicer for materials such as Silk, TPU, polycarbonate, and carbon fiber.

    IMG_9933 (resized).jpg
    #2910 7 days ago

    you will love the MK3 I have had 2 of them and they are just amazing. Enders are awesome but the MK3 is a step above IMO… the software is hands down better and goes you more control. Most important they just work, kinda set and forget. Congrats!

    #2911 7 days ago
    Quoted from Soulrider911:

    you will love the MK3 I have had 2 of them and they are just amazing. Enders are awesome but the MK3 is a step above IMO… the software is hands down better and goes you more control. Most important they just work, kinda set and forget. Congrats!

    I really looking forward to printing the exotic like carbon and TPU with the direct drive

    #2912 6 days ago
    Quoted from hoby1:

    After years of using Ender 3s " and I still love them" I am going to give the Prusa MK3S+ a try.
    I was going to upgrade to a Sprite extruder and a new motherboard but said what the heck.
    It's 799 with no back order right now for the kit..... plus the Black Friday deal of free shipping, free roll of orange PETG, 10 coupon , and extra textured sheet. Saves about 160 bucks from the order.
    I really think it will be a solid machine with the direct drive and their slicer for materials such as Silk, TPU, polycarbonate, and carbon fiber.[quoted image]

    Nice. Watch this and you'll feel extra confident about your purchase. Lots of haters in the comments who don't really get what his point is, but you can't go wrong with a prusa.

    #2913 6 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    and a replacement for the speaker mounting plate, to let me put 5.25" speakers in the machine.

    Pete, thanks for this as well, so very much! The 5.25” speaker adapter plates are a huge contribution to the community, and provide a great alternative to the $50 adapter plates sold elsewhere. You’re the best!

    #2914 6 days ago

    I just bought my first machine and I am waiting for it. Lots of things cooking for 2023
    My first printer will be a bamboo 1P1

    Very excited!

    #2915 6 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    I just bought my first machine and I am waiting for it. Lots of things cooking for 2023
    My first printer will be a bamboo 1P1
    Very excited!

    Nice choice. I just watched a video on it and while it doesn't have all of the bells and whistles of the carbon it should be pretty impressive regardless. Also it seems there is an upgrade path for most of the things it's missing so you can decide if those end up being important to you as you learn how everything works. Welcome to the club.

    #2916 6 days ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    Nice choice. I just watched a video on it and while it doesn't have all of the bells and whistles of the carbon it should be pretty impressive regardless. Also it seems there is an upgrade path for most of the things it's missing so you can decide if those end up being important to you as you learn how everything works. Welcome to the club.

    Thanks! Been thinking of doing for many months now and stumbled on the bamboos and joined a x1c club just to hear the chatter and I was very impressed by that machine.
    To me it is currently too much for the xc1 so the 1p1 will be perfect for the reasons you just mentioned.

    There are a ton of things I wanr to make, but primarily, like many here, being able build parts and other solutions.

    Have a fee mods in mind and maybe who knows getting a little deeper into the mod world. Lots to learn.

    So excited to soon be part of this club! And glad to see familiar names!

    #2917 6 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    Thanks! Been thinking of doing for many months now and stumbled on the bamboos and joined a x1c club just to hear the chatter and I was very impressed by that machine.
    To me it is currently too much for the xc1 so the 1p1 will be perfect for the reasons you just mentioned.
    There are a ton of things I wanr to make, but primarily, like many here, being able build parts and other solutions.
    Have a fee mods in mind and maybe who knows getting a little deeper into the mod world. Lots to learn.
    So excited to soon be part of this club! And glad to see familiar names!

    The best advice I can give is that once you are comfortable printing other people's parts spend a bit of time learning some CAD software. you don't need to be really good at it, just enough to modify other people's parts and to make your own simple parts and the usefulness of the printer will go up substantially.

    I chose Fusion 360 and watched maybe 2 hours of tutorials on youtube and as a result of that tiny investment I've made hundreds of my own parts. You don't realize how powerful it is to make simple stuff that is custom designed for your specific circumstance until you start doing it. And sometimes you find someone else's part just needs a simple change to fit your situation and being able to do that is great.

    #2918 6 days ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    The best advice I can give is that once you are comfortable printing other people's parts spend a bit of time learning some CAD software. you don't need to be really good at it, just enough to modify other people's parts and to make your own simple parts and the usefulness of the printer will go up substantially.
    I chose Fusion 360 and watched maybe 2 hours of tutorials on youtube and as a result of that tiny investment I've made hundreds of my own parts. You don't realize how powerful it is to make simple stuff that is custom designed for your specific circumstance until you start doing it. And sometimes you find someone else's part just needs a simple change to fit your situation and being able to do that is great.

    Thank you and I agree.
    I am doing this mostly for this reason as I often times think to myself this way but dont have the tools to get it done.
    Learning to fix a pinball it is getting easier and easier, from the basic of doing mechanical repairs to building my own boards and dmd screens from scratch, this is the next logical step and will culminate with me restoring an entire machine.
    It is a lot of fun.

    You nailed it again and just wanted to add to what you said that the added freedom this gives me is invaluable. I like being able to create these things inhouse!

    Love it!
    What a great hobby this is, ha. Learned so much about a lot of things when repairing and working my own games.

    #2919 5 days ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    The best advice I can give is that once you are comfortable printing other people's parts spend a bit of time learning some CAD software. you don't need to be really good at it, just enough to modify other people's parts and to make your own simple parts and the usefulness of the printer will go up substantially.
    I chose Fusion 360 and watched maybe 2 hours of tutorials on youtube and as a result of that tiny investment I've made hundreds of my own parts. You don't realize how powerful it is to make simple stuff that is custom designed for your specific circumstance until you start doing it. And sometimes you find someone else's part just needs a simple change to fit your situation and being able to do that is great.

    I wish I could upvote this post a million times.

    My 3D printer was originally meant as an educational tool for my kids, to use for school (homeschool) projects and for their robotics teams. And it did work okay for that (and still does for the ones who haven't gone off to college yet).

    But what really unlocked the potential for the printer was me spending time learning Fusion 360 this summer. I have at least a dozen projects around the house that had been waiting for me to figure out one mechanical problem or another, and once I got even a little bit competent with Fusion 360 (which only took a few hours of practice, though even now I can still run into specific problems that all by themselves can take me hours to figure out, usually involving bugs in Fusion 360, where I need to figure out a workaround), I found task after task that the printer was helping me with.

    Need to mount a security camera, but need a custom bracket to position the camera in the right place? 3D print it. Need to dress up the holes in the soffit where the CAT6 for the cameras comes out? 3D print it. Need some standoffs so you can zip-tie a PVC pipe to your deck post for your satellite Internet antenna? 3D print it. Need a perfectly-sized grommet for the satellite cable to go through a wall face plate? 3D print it. Need a hinge shim to help change the hang of an interior door so it will stop swinging closed and instead lay flat against the wall where you want it? 3D print it? Did the valve lever for your hose shutoff break? 3D print a new one.

    That's just a small sampling of the designs I made so far. I love looking around the house and seeing one thing after another I was able to fix on my own, just by 3D printing the weird custom part that was the perfect solution for whatever problem I had.

    It's like magic. You think of the thing you need. And then a few hours later, you're holding it in your hand. I cannot properly articulate just how incredibly satisfying that experience is.

    #2920 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    I wish I could upvote this post a million times.
    My 3D printer was originally meant as an educational tool for my kids, to use for school (homeschool) projects and for their robotics teams. And it did work okay for that (and still does for the ones who haven't gone off to college yet).
    But what really unlocked the potential for the printer was me spending time learning Fusion 360 this summer. I have at least a dozen projects around the house that had been waiting for me to figure out one mechanical problem or another, and once I got even a little bit competent with Fusion 360 (which only took a few hours of practice, though even now I can still run into specific problems that all by themselves can take me hours to figure out, usually involving bugs in Fusion 360, where I need to figure out a workaround), I found task after task that the printer was helping me with.
    Need to mount a security camera, but need a custom bracket to position the camera in the right place? 3D print it. Need to dress up the holes in the soffit where the CAT6 for the cameras comes out? 3D print it. Need some standoffs so you can zip-tie a PVC pipe to your deck post for your satellite Internet antenna? 3D print it. Need a perfectly-sized grommet for the satellite cable to go through a wall face plate? 3D print it. Need a hinge shim to help change the hang of an interior door so it will stop swinging closed and instead lay flat against the wall where you want it? 3D print it? Did the valve lever for your hose shutoff break? 3D print a new one.
    That's just a small sampling of the designs I made so far. I love looking around the house and seeing one thing after another I was able to fix on my own, just by 3D printing the weird custom part that was the perfect solution for whatever problem I had.
    It's like magic. You think of the thing you need. And then a few hours later, you're holding it in your hand. I cannot properly articulate just how incredibly satisfying that experience is.

    Ha! Love it.
    I think I am going to love 3d printing reallly!

    #2921 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    I wish I could upvote this post a million times.
    My 3D printer was originally meant as an educational tool for my kids, to use for school (homeschool) projects and for their robotics teams. And it did work okay for that (and still does for the ones who haven't gone off to college yet).
    But what really unlocked the potential for the printer was me spending time learning Fusion 360 this summer. I have at least a dozen projects around the house that had been waiting for me to figure out one mechanical problem or another, and once I got even a little bit competent with Fusion 360 (which only took a few hours of practice, though even now I can still run into specific problems that all by themselves can take me hours to figure out, usually involving bugs in Fusion 360, where I need to figure out a workaround), I found task after task that the printer was helping me with.
    Need to mount a security camera, but need a custom bracket to position the camera in the right place? 3D print it. Need to dress up the holes in the soffit where the CAT6 for the cameras comes out? 3D print it. Need some standoffs so you can zip-tie a PVC pipe to your deck post for your satellite Internet antenna? 3D print it. Need a perfectly-sized grommet for the satellite cable to go through a wall face plate? 3D print it. Need a hinge shim to help change the hang of an interior door so it will stop swinging closed and instead lay flat against the wall where you want it? 3D print it? Did the valve lever for your hose shutoff break? 3D print a new one.
    That's just a small sampling of the designs I made so far. I love looking around the house and seeing one thing after another I was able to fix on my own, just by 3D printing the weird custom part that was the perfect solution for whatever problem I had.
    It's like magic. You think of the thing you need. And then a few hours later, you're holding it in your hand. I cannot properly articulate just how incredibly satisfying that experience is.

    Yeah those are some great examples. Little things that you either would have to fix with an ugly hack or pay $20 for a $0.02 piece of plastic from China you can now fix on your own and make the solution specific to your exact needs. It's great.

    I have 3d printed templates a bunch of times too. Need to cut a piece of mylar in a circle but don't have a compass? 3d print a template. Need to cut some exact angles for an arcade cabinet you're building? 3d print the angles and trace them onto the wood.
    The other day I needed to drill holes in some aluminum tube so I whipped up a jig in fusion to make sure I was able to drill straight with accuracy. I was able to make the hole the exact size of my drill bit it wouldn't slip. A lot of things will already exist on thingiverse or printables but there's something so satisfying about making it yourself even if it's something simple like a washer or spacer.

    #2922 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    I wish I could upvote this post a million times.
    My 3D printer was originally meant as an educational tool for my kids, to use for school (homeschool) projects and for their robotics teams. And it did work okay for that (and still does for the ones who haven't gone off to college yet).
    But what really unlocked the potential for the printer was me spending time learning Fusion 360 this summer. I have at least a dozen projects around the house that had been waiting for me to figure out one mechanical problem or another, and once I got even a little bit competent with Fusion 360 (which only took a few hours of practice, though even now I can still run into specific problems that all by themselves can take me hours to figure out, usually involving bugs in Fusion 360, where I need to figure out a workaround), I found task after task that the printer was helping me with.
    Need to mount a security camera, but need a custom bracket to position the camera in the right place? 3D print it. Need to dress up the holes in the soffit where the CAT6 for the cameras comes out? 3D print it. Need some standoffs so you can zip-tie a PVC pipe to your deck post for your satellite Internet antenna? 3D print it. Need a perfectly-sized grommet for the satellite cable to go through a wall face plate? 3D print it. Need a hinge shim to help change the hang of an interior door so it will stop swinging closed and instead lay flat against the wall where you want it? 3D print it? Did the valve lever for your hose shutoff break? 3D print a new one.
    That's just a small sampling of the designs I made so far. I love looking around the house and seeing one thing after another I was able to fix on my own, just by 3D printing the weird custom part that was the perfect solution for whatever problem I had.
    It's like magic. You think of the thing you need. And then a few hours later, you're holding it in your hand. I cannot properly articulate just how incredibly satisfying that experience is.

    We keep our Prusa Mini in the kitchen. I don’t know how I lived without it and Fusion 360.

    #2923 5 days ago
    Quoted from DiabloRush:

    Pete, thanks for this as well, so very much! The 5.25” speaker adapter plates are a huge contribution to the community, and provide a great alternative to the $50 adapter plates sold elsewhere. You’re the best!

    Kind words, thank you. I do hope it's useful to lots of other people. I wax on about the virtues of 3D printing, but a lot of my personal examples are unique to my specific needs. It would be gratifying if once in a while, the work I put into a design can benefit more than just me.

    With that mounting plate, my two main concerns are that a) I only have the one speaker model to use it with, and so while I assume there's some standardization to the car audio form factors, I don't really know for sure that that design could be used by anyone with any speaker other than the Alpines I used it with, and b) the need to get some specialized hardware (the hex drive screws) might turn some people off who otherwise could benefit from the design.

    That said, I do suspect that there is a fairly standard form factor for this size speaker, and while the metal plates you can buy retail have their appeal in terms of compatibility with the OEM hardware fasteners, you still need to get additional parts -- ironically, in some cases 3D printed ones -- to complete the install, while this mounting plate includes everything as a single design, printable as a complete part, or in two pieces for those that are going to use LEDs or just prefer the convenience. So I'm hopeful that my concerns are not serious ones.

    #2924 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Kind words, thank you. I do hope it's useful to lots of other people. I wax on about the virtues of 3D printing, but a lot of my personal examples are unique to my specific needs. It would be gratifying if once in a while, the work I put into a design can benefit more than just me.
    With that mounting plate, my two main concerns are that a) I only have the one speaker model to use it with, and so while I assume there's some standardization to the car audio form factors, I don't really know for sure that that design could be used by anyone with any speaker other than the Alpines I used it with, and b) the need to get some specialized hardware (the hex drive screws) might turn some people off who otherwise could benefit from the design.
    That said, I do suspect that there is a fairly standard form factor for this size speaker, and while the metal plates you can buy retail have their appeal in terms of compatibility with the OEM hardware fasteners, you still need to get additional parts -- ironically, in some cases 3D printed ones -- to complete the install, while this mounting plate includes everything as a single design, printable as a complete part, or in two pieces for those that are going to use LEDs or just prefer the convenience. So I'm hopeful that my concerns are not serious ones.

    I was going to take a look at your design to assess how different my speaker mounting holes are compared to yours.

    Otherwise, if you used Fusion, it's probably a simple matter of adjusting in the sketch the hole position

    #2925 5 days ago
    Quoted from Ashram56:

    if you used Fusion, it's probably a simple matter of adjusting in the sketch the hole position

    Funny you mention that.

    Most of the hours I put into this design, were fighting with Fusion 360 fine-tuning the hole position, once I realized I'd failed to line it up initially.

    Some (most?) of that is my inexperience, which led to the initial sketch that defines the hole position and other elements in that plane not being constrained in a way to support that kind of edit. I'd guess a more expert designer would have built the sketch and subsequent features differently, working more in line with what Fusion expects.

    But in my case, the first time I went to move the hole, the sketch itself got all screwed up. And even once I reworked the sketch to get the constraints right, so that I could move the hole and the mounting boss profile (which needs to be tied to the hole) without causing all of the non-hole lines in the sketch to get distorted, Fusion still had lots of trouble tracking bodies and profiles involved in the later operations, and my timeline got filled with lots of warnings and errors.

    Every time that happened, it meant I had to step through my timeline and redo each feature, fixing up whatever references Fusion had gotten confused about. Very tedious work, and it happened at least three or four times.

    I'm sure one day I will know how to use Fusion well enough to be able to avoid these kinds of problems. But I'm definitely not there yet.

    #2926 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Funny you mention that.
    Most of the hours I put into this design, were fighting with Fusion 360 fine-tuning the hole position, once I realized I'd failed to line it up initially.
    Some (most?) of that is my inexperience, which led to the initial sketch that defines the hole position and other elements in that plane not being constrained in a way to support that kind of edit. I'd guess a more expert designer would have built the sketch and subsequent features differently, working more in line with what Fusion expects.
    But in my case, the first time I went to move the hole, the sketch itself got all screwed up. And even once I reworked the sketch to get the constraints right, so that I could move the hole and the mounting boss profile (which needs to be tied to the hole) without causing all of the non-hole lines in the sketch to get distorted, Fusion still had lots of trouble tracking bodies and profiles involved in the later operations, and my timeline got filled with lots of warnings and errors.
    Every time that happened, it meant I had to step through my timeline and redo each feature, fixing up whatever references Fusion had gotten confused about. Very tedious work, and it happened at least three or four times.
    I'm sure one day I will know how to use Fusion well enough to be able to avoid these kinds of problems. But I'm definitely not there yet.

    I've had this issue a lot too. I also find that for some reason whatever way I set up constraints there is almost always one constraint it won't let me delete. Then if I have to go back and adjust things I'm stuck.

    Usually my designs are simple enough that I can just re-do things myself but understanding how to use constraints correctly is really powerful. It feels great when they work and you go back to adjust something and everything just changes exactly how you want it to.

    #2927 5 days ago

    I am getting way ahead of myself here and what I am asking might be laughable for someone more experienced so please excuse the ignorance.

    but what kind of accuracy can be achieved when printing right angles, for example, if you were to print a mortice and tenon type of junction?

    I am currently re-drawing files in illustrator (I know these won't work in the printer) that will be laser cut so I can assemble a tron mini arcade cabinet, but then I was thinking... why could not I just 3d print this cabinet?

    Please remember I have zero experience with 3d printing, so go easy on me but if you could at least tell me know as to whether this or a similar design could be 3d printed, that would be great.

    As you can see in the drawing attached, the pieces are meant to be laser cut in 2.3mm thick material (delrin and clear acrylic) and then assembled as in the other pictured. All the pieces interlock to each other and everything is then secured (although not necessary to keep it together) by a screw on the side.

    Can this be 3d printed?

    CBC414E7-21AE-45A5-B5B7-16E2AC0D91C4 (resized).jpegScreenshot 2022-11-25 at 4.06.10 PM (resized).png
    #2928 5 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    Can this be 3d printed?

    Sure.

    The laser cutter and 3D printers are using essentially the same stepper motor technology. There may be subtle differences in the accuracy and precision of each, but for the most part, you're looking at about the same performance, given the same budget.

    3D printers have no trouble at all making square corners. The limitation here would be how well aligned the frame of the printer itself is, and barring some damage that occurs during shipping, or some error in assembly (if dealing with a kit), the rails and other pieces of the printer should be nice and square.

    Harder is dealing with overhangs. In the case of the cabinet you're asking about, the biggest potential issue I see is that the cabinet involves a large void in the middle. This possibly could be handled okay with supports; you seem to have access the void, which will allow you to get in there with needle-nose pliers to pull the supports off the print, and as I've been finding with the latest PrusaSlicer version, it can do a very good job with supports, minimizing scarring.

    But it can't eliminate scarring (i.e. texturing seen where the supports contact the actual designed print) completely. You might find that with the texture on the inside of the cabinet, you're okay with that. But in that specific example, you might find it make more sense to design it in two parts: one side of the cabinet along with all the horizontal elements holding the sides together, and then the other side of the cabinet.

    That would likely avoid the need for supports at all. As far as attaching the sides go, you could stick with the mortised design you have, but obviously you would only need to mortise one of the side panels; the one with the horizontal elements would just be printed as a single piece, with the side of the cabinet face down on the build plate. For the other side panel, I would go with a half-depth mortise (recesses), which you could then use to align the pieces for gluing, but which would not be visible once the whole thing was assembled. That panel would also be printed with the outside face down on the build plate, obviating the need for supports, even with the recesses to accept tabs on the other part.

    If you want to use a screw to hold things together, that would still work fine as well, instead of glue.

    Of course, you could just print the whole thing as individual pieces identical to what you're laser cutting. But IMHO doing it that way negates a lot of the benefit of using a 3D printer.

    #2929 5 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    I am getting way ahead of myself here and what I am asking might be laughable for someone more experienced so please excuse the ignorance.
    but what kind of accuracy can be achieved when printing right angles, for example, if you were to print a mortice and tenon type of junction?
    I am currently re-drawing files in illustrator (I know these won't work in the printer) that will be laser cut so I can assemble a tron mini arcade cabinet, but then I was thinking... why could not I just 3d print this cabinet?
    Please remember I have zero experience with 3d printing, so go easy on me but if you could at least tell me know as to whether this or a similar design could be 3d printed, that would be great.
    As you can see in the drawing attached, the pieces are meant to be laser cut in 2.3mm thick material (delrin and clear acrylic) and then assembled as in the other pictured. All the pieces interlock to each other and everything is then secured (although not necessary to keep it together) by a screw on the side.
    Can this be 3d printed?[quoted image][quoted image]

    Can it be printed as one piece? Sure, if you don't mind the rough surfaces from the support.
    Can it be printed just like that? (flat pieces put together), yes.. in fact sometimes I split my model into pieces that assemble separately because it eliminates support and can often reduce print time (you're mostly printing object, not support).

    I 3d printed an arcade cabinet for street fighter (still has supports, but they are all inside)

    The bridge mod for godzilla, the main bridge is 4 pieces, then the "ropes" is another 6 pieces, and then there's 2 pieces that slide down (necessary in order for the user to install)

    godzilla bridge mod (resized).png
    #2930 5 days ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    Can it be printed as one piece? Sure, if you don't mind the rough surfaces from the support.
    Can it be printed just like that? (flat pieces put together), yes.. in fact sometimes I split my model into pieces that assemble separately because it eliminates support and can often reduce print time (you're mostly printing object, not support).
    I 3d printed an arcade cabinet for street fighter (still has supports, but they are all inside)
    The bridge mod for godzilla, the main bridge is 4 pieces, then the "ropes" is another 6 pieces, and then there's 2 pieces that slide down (necessary in order for the user to install)[quoted image]

    That mini SF2 cabinet looks awesome!!

    #2931 5 days ago

    I haven't followed this entire thread, but this company makes awesome 3D printing glue. I used to use gorilla super glue, but you have to hold it tight for like 30 seconds and its still prone to stress breaks. 3D Gloop melts the plastic and fuses it and you only have to hold for about 2-5 seconds before letting go.

    https://www.3dgloop.com/

    #2932 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Sure.
    The laser cutter and 3D printers are using essentially the same stepper motor technology. There may be subtle differences in the accuracy and precision of each, but for the most part, you're looking at about the same performance, given the same budget.
    3D printers have no trouble at all making square corners. The limitation here would be how well aligned the frame of the printer itself is, and barring some damage that occurs during shipping, or some error in assembly (if dealing with a kit), the rails and other pieces of the printer should be nice and square.
    Harder is dealing with overhangs. In the case of the cabinet you're asking about, the biggest potential issue I see is that the cabinet involves a large void in the middle. This possibly could be handled okay with supports; you seem to have access the void, which will allow you to get in there with needle-nose pliers to pull the supports off the print, and as I've been finding with the latest PrusaSlicer version, it can do a very good job with supports, minimizing scarring.
    But it can't eliminate scarring (i.e. texturing seen where the supports contact the actual designed print) completely. You might find that with the texture on the inside of the cabinet, you're okay with that. But in that specific example, you might find it make more sense to design it in two parts: one side of the cabinet along with all the horizontal elements holding the sides together, and then the other side of the cabinet.
    That would likely avoid the need for supports at all. As far as attaching the sides go, you could stick with the mortised design you have, but obviously you would only need to mortise one of the side panels; the one with the horizontal elements would just be printed as a single piece, with the side of the cabinet face down on the build plate. For the other side panel, I would go with a half-depth mortise (recesses), which you could then use to align the pieces for gluing, but which would not be visible once the whole thing was assembled. That panel would also be printed with the outside face down on the build plate, obviating the need for supports, even with the recesses to accept tabs on the other part.
    If you want to use a screw to hold things together, that would still work fine as well, instead of glue.
    Of course, you could just print the whole thing as individual pieces identical to what you're laser cutting. But IMHO doing it that way negates a lot of the benefit of using a 3D printer.

    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    Can it be printed as one piece? Sure, if you don't mind the rough surfaces from the support.
    Can it be printed just like that? (flat pieces put together), yes.. in fact sometimes I split my model into pieces that assemble separately because it eliminates support and can often reduce print time (you're mostly printing object, not support).
    I 3d printed an arcade cabinet for street fighter (still has supports, but they are all inside)
    The bridge mod for godzilla, the main bridge is 4 pieces, then the "ropes" is another 6 pieces, and then there's 2 pieces that slide down (necessary in order for the user to install)[quoted image]

    Ha! I am already loving this thread and the people here and have not received my printer yet!! Lol

    Thank you for your messages!! This is awesome.

    I have lots of questions about these designs.

    Is it ok if I put them here on the thread or would this clog the thread up? Notnsure it the thread is to share files or anything 3d related

    #2933 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Funny you mention that.
    Most of the hours I put into this design, were fighting with Fusion 360 fine-tuning the hole position, once I realized I'd failed to line it up initially.
    Some (most?) of that is my inexperience, which led to the initial sketch that defines the hole position and other elements in that plane not being constrained in a way to support that kind of edit. I'd guess a more expert designer would have built the sketch and subsequent features differently, working more in line with what Fusion expects.
    But in my case, the first time I went to move the hole, the sketch itself got all screwed up. And even once I reworked the sketch to get the constraints right, so that I could move the hole and the mounting boss profile (which needs to be tied to the hole) without causing all of the non-hole lines in the sketch to get distorted, Fusion still had lots of trouble tracking bodies and profiles involved in the later operations, and my timeline got filled with lots of warnings and errors.
    Every time that happened, it meant I had to step through my timeline and redo each feature, fixing up whatever references Fusion had gotten confused about. Very tedious work, and it happened at least three or four times.
    I'm sure one day I will know how to use Fusion well enough to be able to avoid these kinds of problems. But I'm definitely not there yet.

    Been there

    Now I always end up sketching everything on a single sketch if possible, then extrude. For example, the holes in my adapter design are defined by the intersection of a circle and a line. That way I can adjust easily the circle diameter to reflect the mounting point of a speaker. I tend to avoid complex shapes in order precisely to avoid situations where the function is messed up because the construction algorithm can't figure out the operation

    I've seen cases however where for some reason the primitives are not defined properly by Fusion so when I adjust it screws up (3 points rectangle comes to mind)

    #2934 5 days ago
    Quoted from dpadam450:

    I haven't followed this entire thread, but this company makes awesome 3D printing glue. I used to use gorilla super glue, but you have to hold it tight for like 30 seconds and its still prone to stress breaks. 3D Gloop melts the plastic and fuses it and you only have to hold for about 2-5 seconds before letting go.
    https://www.3dgloop.com/

    I was going to say cyanoacrylate fuses them pretty well already but then I saw the gif on that site of the guys pulling on those handles... yeah that looks like pretty good glue lol. Not sure I have a need for that but it looks impressive

    #2935 5 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    Is it ok if I put them here on the thread or would this clog the thread up?

    Um...both?

    My two cents, worth what you paid for it...

    I think this thread was probably originally meant mainly as a way to share designs. But it's clearly evolved into as much a place to discuss stuff as to just share.

    Pinside is primarily a pinball-related forum, and I think it makes sense to try to keep things pinball-related. If you are working on pinball-related designs, I'd say that's 100% on-topic and would be fine in this thread. If/when this single thread turns out to not be able to accommodate discussion about 3D printing topics, I guess the community could work on figuring out a better approach, such as saying that new 3D-printing questions deserve their own threads in a specific subforum (e.g. https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/forum/modding-pinball or maybe https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/forum/tools-supplies), or maybe it'd be time to create a 3D printing-specific subforum (e.g. under the "Tech" subforum).

    Extended discussions do kind of clog this thread up. But as far as I can tell from my short tenure here so far, it's been manageable. The hardest thing for me was to get caught up on the dozens of pages of posts that already existed when I first found the thread. But there's no requirement a person does that, and it's easy enough to search the thread if you know what you are looking for.

    Bottom line: for now, I think this thread is the best that this site has for 3D printing stuff, so if you've got a question and answering it would contribute to your or someone else's ability to further their goals as a pinball hobbyist or professional, I'd say it is perfectly fine here. I would include in that general 3D printing questions, assuming your long-term goals involve using 3D printing to support your pinball habit.

    All that said, I'll note that there are of course other web sites that are dedicated to 3D printing, and can probably handle your questions more efficiently, in more detail, or even more accurately. In many cases, a question that seems novel here, may well already have been asked and answered at one of the dedicated sites. Personally, my first go-to place for 3D printing questions would be places like https://3dprinting.stackexchange.com/ or https://forum.prusa3d.com/. I think the Stack Exchange model works okay for relatively low-traffic stuff, and of course the Prusa forums are great for anyone with a Prusa printer, but may be a good resource for more general questions. In theory, the Autodesk Fusion 360 forums (https://forums.autodesk.com/t5/fusion-360/ct-p/1234) should be useful for people trying to learn Fusion 360, but my experience there has been hit and miss. I find it's pretty good if the question I have is already answered and I'm just looking things up with a web search, but I haven't gotten much traction on actual questions I've posted.

    There are probably lots of other options for 3D printing questions as well. You should definitely feel free to post questions here, but just be aware that you could get better results in many cases by targeting a broader, more experienced audience (not to say there aren't a few people here with a great deal of experience with 3D printing, but they are still few and far between, whereas you'd get dozens if not hundreds of such individuals reading your questions elsewhere).

    #2936 5 days ago

    The absolute best adhesive for gluing 3D printed parts that I’ve used is SCIGRIP 16 Acrylic Cement.

    #2937 5 days ago
    Quoted from Ashram56:

    I always end up sketching everything on a single sketch if possible

    Hah. Funny you'd say that. That's what I've always tried to do, and I'm starting to think I should use multiple sketches break my designs into individual features.

    For example, my speaker mounting plate already has two main sketches, one for each plane of interest, i.e. the main plane, and the flange on the side. But in hindsight, I wonder if it would've worked better to break the main plane's sketch into one for the main shape and four mounting holes for the plate itself, another just for the opening for the speaker, and then one more for the bosses the speaker attaches to.

    If I'd done that, I think there might've been less chance for me to accidentally create constraints that interact funny between those features. As it is, I had trouble moving the opening for the speaker, where first the boss's shape got completely fubar-ed (turned inside out) as I tried to move the hole, and then one of the plate's mounting holes and its mirrored partner on the other side got distorted as one of the arcs composing the hole got pulled out of shape for some reason.

    Well, I'm still definitely a newbie when it comes to Fusion 360, and I don't mind the exploration process. I look forward to many more mistakes in the future, and trying new things to see if I can improve my efficiency in the design software.

    #2938 5 days ago
    Quoted from Anony:

    I was going to say cyanoacrylate fuses them pretty well already but then I saw the gif on that site of the guys pulling on those handles... yeah that looks like pretty good glue lol. Not sure I have a need for that but it looks impressive

    I've used CA glue for basic bonding, even on PETG. But only for things that don't have to be high-strength. My understanding is that PETG is a "low energy" polymer, and CA doesn't adhere very well to it. That 3D print-specific glue is pretty spendy if you ask me, but it looks like the real deal. One of the biggest challenges for in 3D printing is dealing with supports and while I find gluing to be a pain, if I could break a model down into smaller support-less prints and then reassemble it in a way that I knew was going to be as strong as if I'd printed it as a single piece, I might find the price of the glue worth it.

    Sounds like there are already at least some people here who can vouch for its effectiveness.

    Quoted from Mr_Tantrum:

    The absolute best adhesive for gluing 3D printed parts that I’ve used is SCIGRIP 16 Acrylic Cement.

    Does that work on all materials, or is it specifically for stuff it can melt and fuse, like e.g. ABS (which as I understand it, some people just use acetone to bond parts together, with good results)?

    #2939 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Does that work on all materials, or is it specifically for stuff it can melt and fuse, like e.g. ABS (which as I understand it, some people just use acetone to bond parts together, with good results)?

    I use it on PLA and PETG, but have not tested on other filaments. It sets in 5 minutes and creates a strong plastic weld.

    #2940 5 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    I am currently re-drawing files in illustrator (I know these won't work in the printer) that will be laser cut so I can assemble a tron mini arcade cabinet, but then I was thinking... why could not I just 3d print this cabinet?

    A few things:

    1. Illustrator files can work for 3D printing, in a sense. Export them to a format your modeling software (Fusion 360, TinkerCAD etc) can read and extrude them into having dimension. Be aware that Adobe are ... less than brilliant about how they've handled SVG export and it won't be the right size. Always check your dimensions if using an Illustrator SVG before extruding

    2. 3D printing is going to be painfully slow compared to laser cutting for this particular application. For a handful maybe that doesn't matter, it's not a great production method in this case though

    3. FDM printed cabinets aren't going to look as nice as laser cut ones, speaking as an owner of one of the original mini cabs. I'd consider it a downgrade personally without a lot of sanding and finish work

    Laser cutting and 3D printing are both awesome. They compliment each other. Sometimes they can both tackle a problem. Usually one is going to be better than the other for a particular task.

    #2941 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Um...both?
    My two cents, worth what you paid for it...
    I think this thread was probably originally meant mainly as a way to share designs. But it's clearly evolved into as much a place to discuss stuff as to just share.
    Pinside is primarily a pinball-related forum, and I think it makes sense to try to keep things pinball-related. If you are working on pinball-related designs, I'd say that's 100% on-topic and would be fine in this thread. If/when this single thread turns out to not be able to accommodate discussion about 3D printing topics, I guess the community could work on figuring out a better approach, such as saying that new 3D-printing questions deserve their own threads in a specific subforum (e.g. https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/forum/modding-pinball or maybe https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/forum/tools-supplies), or maybe it'd be time to create a 3D printing-specific subforum (e.g. under the "Tech" subforum).
    Extended discussions do kind of clog this thread up. But as far as I can tell from my short tenure here so far, it's been manageable. The hardest thing for me was to get caught up on the dozens of pages of posts that already existed when I first found the thread. But there's no requirement a person does that, and it's easy enough to search the thread if you know what you are looking for.
    Bottom line: for now, I think this thread is the best that this site has for 3D printing stuff, so if you've got a question and answering it would contribute to your or someone else's ability to further their goals as a pinball hobbyist or professional, I'd say it is perfectly fine here. I would include in that general 3D printing questions, assuming your long-term goals involve using 3D printing to support your pinball habit.
    All that said, I'll note that there are of course other web sites that are dedicated to 3D printing, and can probably handle your questions more efficiently, in more detail, or even more accurately. In many cases, a question that seems novel here, may well already have been asked and answered at one of the dedicated sites. Personally, my first go-to place for 3D printing questions would be places like https://3dprinting.stackexchange.com/ or https://forum.prusa3d.com/. I think the Stack Exchange model works okay for relatively low-traffic stuff, and of course the Prusa forums are great for anyone with a Prusa printer, but may be a good resource for more general questions. In theory, the Autodesk Fusion 360 forums (https://forums.autodesk.com/t5/fusion-360/ct-p/1234) should be useful for people trying to learn Fusion 360, but my experience there has been hit and miss. I find it's pretty good if the question I have is already answered and I'm just looking things up with a web search, but I haven't gotten much traction on actual questions I've posted.
    There are probably lots of other options for 3D printing questions as well. You should definitely feel free to post questions here, but just be aware that you could get better results in many cases by targeting a broader, more experienced audience (not to say there aren't a few people here with a great deal of experience with 3D printing, but they are still few and far between, whereas you'd get dozens if not hundreds of such individuals reading your questions elsewhere).

    thank you for this, and also for you sharing these links and I will check them out.

    Quoted from Aurich:

    A few things:
    1. Illustrator files can work for 3D printing, in a sense. Export them to a format your modeling software (Fusion 360, TinkerCAD etc) can read and extrude them into having dimension. Be aware that Adobe are ... less than brilliant about how they've handled SVG export and it won't be the right size. Always check your dimensions if using an Illustrator SVG before extruding
    2. 3D printing is going to be painfully slow compared to laser cutting for this particular application. For a handful maybe that doesn't matter, it's not a great production method in this case though
    3. FDM printed cabinets aren't going to look as nice as laser cut ones, speaking as an owner of one of the original mini cabs. I'd consider it a downgrade personally without a lot of sanding and finish work
    Laser cutting and 3D printing are both awesome. They compliment each other. Sometimes they can both tackle a problem. Usually one is going to be better than the other for a particular task.

    Good points here, and I agree with you.
    I just started tonight reading about different printing materials and I am having a good time discovering it all.

    I agree on your points and particularly on the finish aspect. I do not think there is a material that can finish the top layer absolutely flat without any imperfections, is it?

    #2942 5 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Hah. Funny you'd say that. That's what I've always tried to do, and I'm starting to think I should use multiple sketches break my designs into individual features.

    For example, my speaker mounting plate already has two main sketches, one for each plane of interest, i.e. the main plane, and the flange on the side. But in hindsight, I wonder if it would've worked better to break the main plane's sketch into one for the main shape and four mounting holes for the plate itself, another just for the opening for the speaker, and then one more for the bosses the speaker attaches to.

    Putting multiple features in a single sketch is really bad practice. I did this very early on 20 years ago, and I think it was just me trying to keep a small feature tree. If you have a long tree, naming key features helps keep things organized and easy to find. Creating sketches with no feature from it can also be helpful in the beginning depending on the part. The biggest thing to keep in mind is that how you dimension things can break features later down the tree, so references (and the order of features) can make a model cleaner and easier to adjust.

    #2943 4 days ago
    Quoted from pete_d:

    Does that work on all materials, or is it specifically for stuff it can melt and fuse, like e.g. ABS (which as I understand it, some people just use acetone to bond parts together, with good results)?

    Works on PLA, PETG, Acrylic, vinyl and Styrene. I’ve used SciGrip-3 and -4 as well - those are like water, no viscosity at all, so you have to REALLY have your 2 pieces perfectly mated, but there is no mess and the bond is super strong

    #2944 4 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    I am getting way ahead of myself here and what I am asking might be laughable for someone more experienced so please excuse the ignorance.
    but what kind of accuracy can be achieved when printing right angles, for example, if you were to print a mortice and tenon type of junction?
    I am currently re-drawing files in illustrator (I know these won't work in the printer) that will be laser cut so I can assemble a tron mini arcade cabinet, but then I was thinking... why could not I just 3d print this cabinet?
    Please remember I have zero experience with 3d printing, so go easy on me but if you could at least tell me know as to whether this or a similar design could be 3d printed, that would be great.
    As you can see in the drawing attached, the pieces are meant to be laser cut in 2.3mm thick material (delrin and clear acrylic) and then assembled as in the other pictured. All the pieces interlock to each other and everything is then secured (although not necessary to keep it together) by a screw on the side.
    Can this be 3d printed?[quoted image][quoted image]

    I think it could be 3D printed, not quite as a whole cabinet though. You need some access inside to install the electronics. You also need a clear panel for the marquee and (rear marquee?) so the backlight can shine through the graphic so maybe you could keep these small pieces as clear acrylic. I would 3D print one side of the cabinet with the horizontal pieces (minus the 2 clear pieces) attached and 3D print the other side of the cabinet flat. Then you just slip in your electronics, 2 clear acrylic pieces, and assemble the final cabinet side piece. You can easily sand the top smooth if your print isn't left with a smooth enough surface to your liking. Sanding a part this small to improve edges or flat sides will take minimal time.

    #2945 4 days ago
    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    I am getting way ahead of myself here and what I am asking might be laughable for someone more experienced so please excuse the ignorance.
    but what kind of accuracy can be achieved when printing right angles, for example, if you were to print a mortice and tenon type of junction?
    I am currently re-drawing files in illustrator (I know these won't work in the printer) that will be laser cut so I can assemble a tron mini arcade cabinet, but then I was thinking... why could not I just 3d print this cabinet?
    Please remember I have zero experience with 3d printing, so go easy on me but if you could at least tell me know as to whether this or a similar design could be 3d printed, that would be great.
    As you can see in the drawing attached, the pieces are meant to be laser cut in 2.3mm thick material (delrin and clear acrylic) and then assembled as in the other pictured. All the pieces interlock to each other and everything is then secured (although not necessary to keep it together) by a screw on the side.
    Can this be 3d printed?[quoted image][quoted image]

    I have several FDM printers, a Resin printer and a let cut machine. For the particular application, the laser cutter is BY FAR the best choice. You will end up with a product in 1/10 of the time, and it will be stronger as well.

    Cons: The acrylic may be somewhat more expensive than filament (in fact, it definitely is)

    Also, laser cutting is more wasteful than FDM printing

    #2946 4 days ago
    Quoted from snakesnsparklers:

    I think it could be 3D printed, not quite as a whole cabinet though. You need some access inside to install the electronics. You also need a clear panel for the marquee and (rear marquee?) so the backlight can shine through the graphic so maybe you could keep these small pieces as clear acrylic. I would 3D print one side of the cabinet with the horizontal pieces (minus the 2 clear pieces) attached and 3D print the other side of the cabinet flat. Then you just slip in your electronics, 2 clear acrylic pieces, and assemble the final cabinet side piece. You can easily sand the top smooth if your print isn't left with a smooth enough surface to your liking. Sanding a part this small to improve edges or flat sides will take minimal time.

    my thought here as well, was wondering how to install the screen once it is all printed so I presume there needs to be access somewhere.
    I am still leaning towards printing as parts as if it was laser cut (but that is mostly ignorance talking at the moment).
    For the time being, I will probably just laser cut it as I have people waiting on this and do not want to work on this forever, but once I have the machine and test a few things I might me able to even come up with a different design. Ashram56 has shared some ideas with me as well, thank you Sir.

    and thanks everybody for your input. appreciate it.
    So much to learn, it is pretty cool.

    #2947 4 days ago

    Having the hobby of pinball and an engineering background in made the jump into 3D printing. Opening my first printer, S1 Pro, and excited about building it and learning to make a few mods I have been hoping for!

    Let’s go!

    07706924-40D0-46E3-9000-B7072FA3E7DB (resized).jpeg
    #2948 4 days ago
    Quoted from TroyS:

    Having the hobby of pinball and an engineering background in made the jump into 3D printing. Opening my first printer, S1 Pro, and excited about building it and learning to make a few mods I have been hoping for!
    Let’s go!
    [quoted image]

    im also an engineer, had been 3d printing at work forever but they were always too expensive as a hobby. about 7 years ago they finally got down to $600 so i pulled the trigger and now im printing something nearly everyday.

    #2949 4 days ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    im also an engineer, had been 3d printing at work forever but they were always too expensive as a hobby. about 7 years ago they finally got down to $600 so i pulled the trigger and now im printing something nearly everyday.

    Awesome to know there’s a whole community out there. Got my printer built and excited to print my first mod that I have been designing for a while. Nothing like jumping right in. Time to slice it and give it a try, that is right after a test print.

    #2950 4 days ago

    My

    Quoted from Pin_Fandango:

    I am getting way ahead of myself here and what I am asking might be laughable for someone more experienced so please excuse the ignorance.
    but what kind of accuracy can be achieved when printing right angles, for example, if you were to print a mortice and tenon type of junction?
    I am currently re-drawing files in illustrator (I know these won't work in the printer) that will be laser cut so I can assemble a tron mini arcade cabinet, but then I was thinking... why could not I just 3d print this cabinet?
    Please remember I have zero experience with 3d printing, so go easy on me but if you could at least tell me know as to whether this or a similar design could be 3d printed, that would be great.
    As you can see in the drawing attached, the pieces are meant to be laser cut in 2.3mm thick material (delrin and clear acrylic) and then assembled as in the other pictured. All the pieces interlock to each other and everything is then secured (although not necessary to keep it together) by a screw on the side.
    Can this be 3d printed?[quoted image][quoted image]

    This would be easy to print in either separate pieces or a a complete unit. I will print one when i get home as a complete unit as a test.

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