(Topic ID: 198154)

3D Desktop printer $139 free shipping


By vid1900

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 58 posts
  • 19 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by Yelobird
  • Topic is favorited by 15 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

No games have been linked to this topic.

    Topic Gallery

    There have been 9 images uploaded to this topic. (View topic image gallery).

    906BD112-3771-4B77-9B15-267E774B028D (resized).jpeg
    E0C102E5-DC8F-42C4-8900-888F4506CB8D (resized).jpeg
    D035450D-63B6-4935-A478-E199EF8363E0 (resized).jpeg
    2B5BA6AC-B34B-4F1E-B5D1-08F9578A5BF7 (resized).jpeg
    0369AE5F-F84F-40BF-B570-0D7A747774AD (resized).jpeg
    8A4648B4-CC7F-4CDB-B282-D55C972DA453 (resized).jpeg
    IMG_2782 (resized).JPG
    1478786064-screen-shot-2016-11-10-at-85355-am (resized).png
    20170421094332_38294 (resized).jpg

    There are 58 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
    #1 3 years ago

    If you've been putting off owning your own 3DP, this is probably your moment to get off the pot.

    https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_343643.html?wid=44&lkid=10315376

    Discount code: GBA8US

    20170421094332_38294 (resized).jpg

    #2 3 years ago

    Hey Vid.... Thx Does this come with software and is the software hard to learn to use?

    #4 3 years ago

    Code expired or VIP deal

    #5 3 years ago

    Code worked for me and it's the cheapest price I found.

    #7 3 years ago

    Wow man.
    Those got cheap fast..

    #8 3 years ago

    How do you scan/photograph the part to be reproduced? Does this printer do that, or do you need some other device?

    #9 3 years ago
    Quoted from KenLayton:

    How do you scan/photograph the part to be reproduced? Does this printer do that, or do you need some other device?

    You could use a 3D scanner, or just draw the part.

    Many pinball parts have already been drawn and can be downloaded from the net.

    Here is a whole pinball machine somebody 3D printed:

    1478786064-screen-shot-2016-11-10-at-85355-am (resized).png

    Here is a bunch of parts already drawn up:

    http://www.yeggi.com/q/pinball/?s=tt

    Wolfmarsh has a bunch of 3D instructions here on Pinside

    #10 3 years ago

    Any recommendations as far as the plastic that is feed into the machine?
    Type? Places to buy?

    #11 3 years ago

    I must assume there must be some plastic to feed into the machine that is stronger or weaker than others? For pinball use, you'd probably want stronger plastics. Are colors limited?

    #12 3 years ago

    I think the only plastic choices are ABS or PLA.....could/quite likely be wrong about that

    #14 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mancave:

    I think the only plastic choices are ABS or PLA.....could/quite likely be wrong about that

    There are a bunch of options now. I have had a 3d printer for a year, still don't know how to use it (no instructions included), but I know it can take 6 different kinds of filament.

    Quoted from KenLayton:

    I must assume there must be some plastic to feed into the machine that is stronger or weaker than others? For pinball use, you'd probably want stronger plastics. Are colors limited?

    Yup, different materials have different properties of strength, hardness, brittleness, etc. So you choose a material suitable to the use of whatever you're printing.

    #15 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    Here is a bunch of parts already drawn up:
    http://www.yeggi.com/q/pinball/?s=tt
    Wolfmarsh has a bunch of 3D instructions here on Pinside

    What an awesome resource!

    #16 3 years ago

    There are a ton of cheap printers. Anet is based off the very well designed prusa i3 (I own the mk2). This does not have self leveling, but not completely necessary. One thing the Anet lacks is rigidity. A lot of the frame is acrylic, versus something like the prusa which has a thick aluminum frame. The Anet takes just as long to build as prusa, which is anywhere from 6-10 hours (including calibration). It's not hard, but it is a lot of time.

    In all honesty your best bet for a first printer is from monoprice for $299:
    https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=13860

    It assembles in literally 20 minutes, then a little bit of calibration. This is a clone of the Wanhao printer which is very well supported with mods on thingiverse. For an extra $40, there is a brace kit that makes it even more rigid, giving you even more consistent prints:
    ebay.com link » Z Brace Kit For Maker Select V1 V2 And V2 1 Or Wanhao Duplicator I3 3d Printer

    Most people print PLA because it's fairly low VOC. DO NOT print ABS unless your printer is in a sealed box with filtering, or it's out in the garage. That stuff will burn your lungs in a small room.

    As far as brands for PLA, I typically buy hatchbox and Bamtak! on amazon prime. Both are usually around $20 for a 2.2lb spool. Problem you run into with the cheaper brands are they usually don't get all the moisture out, which gives you inconsistent layers, and often those layers don't bond in the Z-axis so your prints can literally split apart with just a little force.

    I've also had good luck with workforce filament, which occasionally goes on sale for $12
    amazon.com link »

    #17 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    You could use a 3D scanner, or just draw the part.

    Scanning requires a LOT of cleanup. You are basically getting a shell (no thickness), which has to be trimmed at the edges, and then all holes have to be closed up before it can be turned into a solid model. Only time you should do this is if it has very complex surfacing that would be hard to replicate from scratch (like a scan of a face)

    Quoted from vid1900:

    Many pinball parts have already been drawn and can be downloaded from the net.

    Thingiverse has a ton of great models in general (lots of useful things).. As far as pinball, pinballmakers.com has tons of pinball parts already modeled:
    http://pinballmakers.com/wiki/index.php/Files_Section

    Quoted from vid1900:

    Here is a bunch of parts already drawn up:
    http://www.yeggi.com/q/pinball/?s=tt

    Yeggi seems to be collecting links from other sites because a part I modeled and only uploaded to thingiverse showed up in that list. A guy in australia was missing the triangle lobed part from the ladder mech on williams fire! so I modeled it, and he was able to print it faster than I could ship him a part:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2407991

    #19 3 years ago
    Quoted from hoby1:

    Wondering what you guys of these units. Very neat and organized

    never heard of the first one.. Tarantula is only decent after you do 2 mods (add dual cooling fans, and replace the flexing acrylic bracket mount for z-axis with a stiffer 3d printed version)

    That's the problem with most cheap printers, they require tinkering. If the chinese companies were smart they would ship these printers with the mods already installed and charge a few bucks more.

    #20 3 years ago

    Cool. Is the software hard to use if you want to make up your own designs?

    #21 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mfsrc791:

    Cool. Is the software hard to use if you want to make up your own designs?

    I'm the wrong person to ask because I've been using 3d software for 20 years now. Ben heck learned to 3d model, but he also started as an illustrator that taught himself electronics and programming.

    Your best bet is to learn fusion 360 because it's free. A much EASIER way to start without downloading software is to create a free account for onshape. It's an online 3d CAD program very similar to fusion, and as someone that uses solidworks I'm pretty impressed. It even allowed me to upload files I've created in solidworks to open there:
    https://www.onshape.com

    There's lots of youtube tutorials for any of these programs. Here's one for onshape that sort of goes through the very basics of the difference between a 2d sketch, and extruding those shapes into a 3d object:

    #22 3 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    I'm the wrong person to ask because I've been using 3d software for 20 years now. Ben heck learned to 3d model, but he also started as an illustrator that taught himself electronics and programming.
    Your best bet is to learn fusion 360 because it's free. A much EASIER way to start without downloading software is to create a free account for onshape. It's an online 3d CAD program very similar to fusion, and as someone that uses solidworks I'm pretty impressed. It even allowed me to upload files I've created in solidworks to open there:
    https://www.onshape.com
    There's lots of youtube tutorials for any of these programs. Here's one for onshape that sort of goes through the very basics of the difference between a 2d sketch, and extruding those shapes into a 3d object:
    » YouTube video

    Awesome! I did solid works in college before i dropped out so I'm somewhat familiar with it. I have a buddy that does alot of computer work so he could definitely help me.

    So is that a decent build area? 8.8x8.8x9.6? Not sure. I've been compareing them and for the price it seems good. I never realized you could get the for less than a grand let alone a few hundred.

    Looks like lots of fun. I just hope if I get one the novelty doesn't wear off very quick and I end up with a big paper weight in my garage.

    #23 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mfsrc791:

    So is that a decent build area? 8.8x8.8x9.6?

    that's a pretty typical bed size these days for a hobby printer. Problem you run into as you go bigger is you lose rigidity both in the axes and the bed. A lot of these new chinese printers are using 80/20 aluminum channel which is very strong, but you still have a bed made of thin aluminum or fiberglass. For instance, there is a printer called CR-10 which has a 12x12x16 bed for just under $500, but many users complain the bed flexes in the middle, so your prints don't come out flat.

    Quoted from Mfsrc791:

    I just hope if I get one the novelty doesn't wear off very quick and I end up with a big paper weight in my garage.

    3d printers have been used to prototype parts in engineering fields for at least 30 years. When they started getting "cheap" about 6 years ago, people were skeptical because people mostly printed figurines and the quality was pretty bad. Now they are REALLY cheap, yet very functional. It really depends on what you want to get out of it. I print everything from pinball mods, to parts I just need around the house.

    #24 3 years ago

    The price isnt bad even if you end up not liking it. I've lost more money on my pinball machines lol. The promo code doesn't work anymore so I would be paying 179 for it

    #25 3 years ago

    The A8 is a good printer and this is the best price I've seen on it.

    #26 3 years ago

    What's your take on the mk2 vs Maker Select v2? I've owned a MS2 for about a year and a half, and I've gotten a lot of good use out of it. I'm happy with it, but I do have some nits with it. Mostly, I spend a good deal of time trying to perfectly level the bed after any service I have to make. Are you happy with the mk2, and do you feel like it's worth the extra money?

    #27 3 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    What an awesome resource!

    Pinside is such an amazing resource!

    This just demonstrates it. Real time.

    #28 3 years ago

    3dprinters are amazing. I want to try but I have a friend who has 3-5.

    He is becoming an Expert he is building a space marine outfit with his son.

    #29 3 years ago
    Quoted from herg:

    What's your take on the mk2 vs Maker Select v2? I've owned a MS2 for about a year and a half, and I've gotten a lot of good use out of it. I'm happy with it, but I do have some nits with it. Mostly, I spend a good deal of time trying to perfectly level the bed after any service I have to make. Are you happy with the mk2, and do you feel like it's worth the extra money?

    I own both.. I've also owned the monoprice dual extruder in the past (similiar in that you still have to level it). I bought the maker select AFTER my prusa as a cheap backup printer. As you know, it's not about the bed being "level", IE all 3 or 4 screws are set at the same height, it's about the bed being flat. Every printer assumes a flat surface, so if it's not and it lays down that first layer, it may not stick in the middle, or you'll get a warped surface. Beyond the auto calibration of the prusa, because it uses the probe to create a virtual bed surface (which re-adjusts before every print which takes less than a minute), you always get a good print anywhere on the bed. Even if your X-Y axis is off, it adjusts for that too. As far as calibration in general, the only time I've needed to go through the process (which is also automatic) is when I replaced my PEI sheet. I've been using it for 6 months, and unless it's a small part without a lot of surface area (where it might not stick), I don't even think about it. I hit print, and walk away.

    #30 3 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    it's about the bed being flat

    Yeah, my aluminum bed is definitely not flat. I fought it for a while, then went to glass on top of the bed. I can print all the way to the edges of the glass now, assuming it is level (height adjusted, whatever you want to call it). Parts are also very easy to remove when I'm finished printing. Switching to PEI doesn't really excite me, but depending on how everything else works out, I'm willing to consider it.

    The procedures where you use a sheet of paper between the nozzle and the bed have never worked very well for me. I end up eyeballing it to get close, then print a first layer test to see how it comes out and adjust accordingly. Once it's dialed in, I don't find that I have to re-adjust very often, and when I do, I'm just looking at the first layer results and making very small tweaks based on it. Clicking "print" and trusting that it will just work would be very nice. I'm not convinced it's worth buying a new printer just for that feature is really worth it to me, though.

    I've done a lot of upgrades to mine; Z-braces, removed the heater output connectors and direct soldered, added LEDs to light the bed, etc. I believe that all of those are addressed with the stock Prusa i3 mk2. If my printer died (something I couldn't fix), I'd probably buy the mk2.

    I had zero success printing ABS. It wanted to curl, the layers separated, and I got fed up with it. PLA is easy to work with, and it's plenty strong for anything I'm using it for, including some parts in pinball where a ball hits it. I am careful about the layer orientation, however, and I avoid any areas with small surface area for layer interface. Sometimes, it requires thinking about which direction to lay the part so that the print lines work well.

    You didn't really say what your opinion is on the comparison between the two printers.

    #31 3 years ago

    I always like to point out the existence of OpenSCAD. It's a scripting language version of CAD software. I find it much easier to use than graphical CAD programs. I was using it to design LED adapters for a pinball game last month.

    #32 3 years ago
    Quoted from herg:

    You didn't really say what your opinion is on the comparison between the two printers

    Prusa rules them all hands down. If it weren't $700 for prebuilt (I DO not want to build one from scratch again at $500) I'd have gone that route. It's also consistently the #3 rated printer:
    https://www.3dhubs.com/3d-printers

    #33 3 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    Prusa rules them all hands down. If it weren't $700 for prebuilt (I DO not want to build one from scratch again at $500) I'd have gone that route. It's also consistently the #3 rated printer:
    https://www.3dhubs.com/3d-printers

    It's $900 for prebuilt, $700 for the kit on the Prusa website. That's partly what makes me hesitant. $700 for a kit that I have to build, when I already have a working printer is tough to swallow.

    #34 3 years ago
    Quoted from herg:

    It's $900 for prebuilt, $700 for the kit on the Prusa website

    Yes sorry, you are correct. It IS a steep price for what you get (which is literally a bunch of 3d printed parts, an aluminum z-frame, an aluminum bed frame, and a bunch of bolts). The only thing that is propitiatory is the bed leveling.. Joseph Prusa claims he doesn't care if someone knocks his printer off, yet the bed is never in stock (he claims they can't keep it in stock because of backlog).

    #35 3 years ago

    https://www.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_392065.html

    Anyone have any experience with this Me Creator 2? Comes fully assembled.

    IMG_2782 (resized).JPG

    #36 3 years ago

    Just like when you build your own Mechmate, if you build it, you are intimately familiar with it.

    #37 3 years ago
    Quoted from TomGWI:

    Anyone have any experience with this Me Creator 2? Comes fully assembled.

    Another clone based on the flashforge creator pro. The previous monoprice printer I had was also based on that. I got decent prints out of it for a year before I started getting horrible Z-wobble which I couldn't solve so I sold it for $100 to let someone else figure it out. That design suffers because the build plate moves in Z rather than the lighter extruder moving up and down. The only thing keeping that bed level are 2 inline bearings in the back, the rest of the bed hangs out in space. If you're considering that, I'd take a chance on a cheaper clone:
    ebay.com link » Ctc 3d Printer Dual Extruder Mk8 Factory Direct Lowest Price Abs Pla

    Quoted from vid1900:

    Just like when you build your own Mechmate, if you build it, you are intimately familiar with it.

    Agreed, which is why I bought my prusa as a kit (that and I saved $200, and got it 2 weeks sooner). However, building the prusa or A8 kit is a lot of work. It can be built in a weekend if you aren't distracted by other things, but keep in mind most build manuals (even prusa) are printed as tiny books. If you go that route, I suggest either printing a pdf copy full size, or have a tablet with the pdf on it so you can zoom.

    #38 3 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    Agreed, which is why I bought my prusa as a kit (that and I saved $200, and got it 2 weeks sooner). However, building the prusa or A8 kit is a lot of work.

    It took me a month to build my first Mechmate, and 3 weeks to build my second.

    http://www.mechmate.com/

    Do not underestimate the amount of time you will spend dicking with stuff........

    #39 3 years ago
    Quoted from vid1900:

    It took me a month to build my first Mechmate, and 3 weeks to build my second.
    http://www.mechmate.com/
    Do not underestimate the amount of time you will spend dicking with stuff........

    Wow, how much does it cost to build a CNC cutting table?

    #40 3 years ago

    These guys are worth a look: https://craftunique.com/ I have one of their first generation printers and it does better than some of the new $2000 models they sell at my local MicroCenter.

    Their slicer software is unique in that I can take solid models and place several different models on the same print. This can really save time on multi-piece prints. They claim that it can be used by any printer that understands gcode. I can't verify that but it is worth looking at. Last time I checked it was still free.

    One of the features I like on my Craftbot is that I don't have to tie my computer up printing. I can just copy it to a memory stick and print directly from the stick. Then I can go back to tweaking the design or getting the next piece ready to print.

    ken

    #41 3 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    Wow, how much does it cost to build a CNC cutting table?

    About $3500 if you already have an old computer to run it.

    There is a guy in MI that machines the rails (that's the only time consuming part if you dyi).

    #42 3 years ago
    Quoted from EvanDickson:

    Wow, how much does it cost to build a CNC cutting table?

    Depends on your level of experience. This is the one I'm building once I clear out some room: https://www.vicious1.com/
    You can google "mostly printed cnc" or "mpcnc" and see a lot of the different ways this system has been used.

    #43 3 years ago

    I just ordered the tarantula! Can't wait to mess around with it. They are having a flash sale for $179 (25 percent off). Seems very similar to the Anet a8 but some people say it can print faster without as much error.

    https://m.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_628790.html

    #44 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mfsrc791:

    I just ordered the tarantula! Can't wait to mess around with it. They are having a flash sale for $179 (25 percent off). Seems very similar to the Anet a8 but some people say it can print faster without as much error.
    https://m.gearbest.com/3d-printers-3d-printer-kits/pp_628790.html

    Dont forget to add the cooling fans to the head . See that as a must

    #45 3 years ago
    Quoted from hoby1:

    Dont forget to add the cooling fans to the head . See that as a must

    Ya I I saw a few mods that are a must. There is a support bracket for the frame and a spool holder that look like they will help alot. I was stuck between this and the Anet a8. Both seemed to require mods to make them print good

    #47 3 years ago

    This thread got me interested in 3d printing again. Started looking at the Anet A8, then considered the Tevo Tarantula and Creality CR-10, but now I am seriously considering the Prusa MK2S. The $100 price drop makes it even more interesting, I just need to pull the trigger.

    #48 3 years ago

    Anyone know what is a good car program to use? SketchUp seems good but kinda sucks for beveling and rounding corners.

    #49 3 years ago
    Quoted from Mfsrc791:

    Anyone know what is a good car program to use? SketchUp seems good but kinda sucks for beveling and rounding corners.

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/3d-desktop-printer-139-free-shipping#post-3971594

    Onshape and fusion 360 are both feature tree driven (IE it's not a bunch of simple vectors with planes drawn between dots like sketchup is). Both can make very complex shapes just like solidworks.

    #50 3 years ago
    Quoted from toyotaboy:

    https://pinside.com/pinball/forum/topic/3d-desktop-printer-139-free-shipping#post-3971594
    Onshape and fusion 360 are both feature tree driven (IE it's not a bunch of simple vectors with planes drawn between dots like sketchup is). Both can make very complex shapes just like solidworks.

    Ok thanks (again). for some reason I forgot you already posted 2 cad programs I should try lol. I thought it was just solid works and that cost money unless your a student.

    I also bought this laptop that seemed like a good deal on Amazon.

    amazon.com link »

    Promoted items from the Pinside Marketplace
    $ 5.00
    Cabinet - Other
    UpKick Pinball
    $ 104.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    From: $ 33.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    Rocket City Pinball
    From: $ 99.99
    Cabinet - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 79.95
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    pinballmod
    $ 139.00
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Sparky Pinball
    $ 259.99
    Cabinet - Toppers
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 229.99
    Lighting - Other
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 89.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 99.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 48.00
    Cabinet - Other
    ModFather Pinball Mods
    $ 495.00
    Cabinet - Armor And Blades
    MI Pinball Refinery
    $ 1.95
    Various Novelties
    Pinball Wheezer
    From: $ 21.00
    Various Other Swag
    Third Coast Pinball
    $ 245.95
    Boards
    Allteksystems
    $ 18.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 124.50
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    The MOD Couple
    From: $ 19.95
    Apparel - Unisex
    Pinball Wheezer
    $ 29.99
    Eproms
    Matt's Basement Arcade
    $ 28.00
    Lighting - Other
    Rock Custom Pinball
    $ 139.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Bent Mods
    $ 94.95
    Cabinet - Shooter Rods
    Super Skill Shot Shop
    $ 69.99
    Playfield - Toys/Add-ons
    Lighted Pinball Mods
    $ 5,999.00
    Pinball Machine
    Gulf Coast Pinball, LLC
    $ 24.99
    Lighting - Led
    Lee's Parts
    From: $ 55.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    Pinball Photos LLC
    $ 100.00
    Gameroom - Decorations
    The Flipper Room
    $ 119.99
    Cabinet - (Alt) Translites
    FlyLand Designs
    $ 8,999.00
    Pinball Machine
    Classic Game Rooms
    There are 58 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.

    Hey there! Got a moment?

    Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run thanks to donations from our visitors? Please donate to Pinside, support the site and get anext to your username to show for it! Donate to Pinside