(Topic ID: 264626)

1976 Williams Space Mission - First Restoration

By cbartal

4 years ago


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  • 52 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 1 year ago by mrm_4
  • Topic is favorited by 9 Pinsiders

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There are 52 posts in this topic. You are on page 1 of 2.
#1 4 years ago

I bought this Space Mission on 2/20/20. I'm hoping to be able to repaint the playfield and clear coat. I'm glad I got it in time to keep me busy during the pandemic. So far I've torn everything apart, bagged up all pieces, removed all mylar and everything from the front and most of the back of the playfield.

You can see that removing the mylar pulled up some paint. I tried several methods, but the one that ultimately did the least damage was to hit the mylar with a heat gun for 5-10 seconds and then pull up. If I heated it longer than that, it caused the mylar to shrink and become brittle which also brought up a lot of paint (see the same player shoots again photo). My next step is cleaning the surface to prep it for repainting and some new decals. If you have any tips for cleaning (including the back of the playfield, I'd love to hear them. I'm going to try vacuuming, naphtha, and maybe magic eraser on the front.

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#2 4 years ago

Did you try freezing the mylar?

#3 4 years ago

I did, but that didn't work for me and Goo Gone only took up a little bit at a time but left a huge mess. The heat gun for 5-10 seconds was the best method and caused the least damage (see the photo). There's a little bit of stickiness left, but I'll figure that out when I clean the surface. Maybe try Goo Gone again?

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#4 4 years ago

I have used goo gone but test it first.
I used alcohol and flour.

#5 4 years ago

Looks like a very rewarding project. Mine only needed some touch up on the key lines, insert filling and a complete clear coat. How do you plan to do the painting? Are you airbrushing?

#6 4 years ago

My SM does not have mylar.
I am surprised to see one that did. Do you think it was factory installed?

#7 4 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

My SM does not have mylar.
I am surprised to see one that did. Do you think it was factory installed?

Mine only had Mylar at the pop bumpers. The Mylar on this one looks like an attempt to slow the wear.

#8 4 years ago
Quoted from Silverstreak02:

Looks like a very rewarding project. Mine only needed some touch up on the key lines, insert filling and a complete clear coat. How do you plan to do the painting? Are you airbrushing?

That's what I'm hoping to do, but I haven't got an airbrush yet. I like the Iwata Neo from what I've seen, and it's in my budget - which is key right now. There are some really large blocks that need covered the same color, so my thought was to lightly sand, airbrush, and get some waterslide decals for the black lettering spots. I haven't quite figured out how to do the turquoise plaid on the yellow by the kick-out holes. There seems to be a lot of discolored wax on there, so right now I've been wet sanding it with De-Solv-It and 1200 grit sandpaper. It's a little slow, but it's showing promise.

Quoted from Silverstreak02:

Mine only had Mylar at the pop bumpers. The Mylar on this one looks like an attempt to slow the wear.

The mylar here was definitely after market (pop bumpers aside)because it was covering up bare wood in many spots.

#9 4 years ago

Hopefully you got to play it before you tore it down.
Its a fun game.

#10 4 years ago
Quoted from cbartal:

That's what I'm hoping to do, but I haven't got an airbrush yet. I like the Iwata Neo from what I've seen, and it's in my budget - which is key right now. There are some really large blocks that need covered the same color, so my thought was to lightly sand, airbrush, and get some waterslide decals for the black lettering spots. I haven't quite figured out how to do the turquoise plaid on the yellow by the kick-out holes. There seems to be a lot of discolored wax on there, so right now I've been wet sanding it with De-Solv-It and 1200 grit sandpaper. It's a little slow, but it's showing promise.

The mylar here was definitely after market (pop bumpers aside)because it was covering up bare wood in many spots.

You don’t need to spend money on the Iwata Neo. A cheap Harbor Freight unit works fine. I did three playfields with the Harbor Freight unit. Have you read the Vids Guide to playfield restorations? It is the ultimate source to learn. Spend some time in each section. It’s not the only way to do it, but it will put you on the right path. Here are a few examples of following his guide.

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#11 4 years ago

I’ll be following this topic!

#12 4 years ago
Quoted from Silverstreak02:

You don’t need to spend money on the Iwata Neo. A cheap Harbor Freight unit works fine.

Your playfields look fantastic! I did read Vid1900's guide, but with coronavirus lockdown I probably can't make it to a Harbor Freight any time soon, lol. I read about using naphtha to remove the wax. What process did you use to do that? I wiped the board down with naphtha once, but I don't think I did it right because there's still a ton of wax.

Quoted from PinballAir:

Hopefully you got to play it before you tore it down.
Its a fun game.

I wish I did, but it was in pretty rough shape, and I had to have it disassembled to bring home. I can't wait to try it, though. I'll just have to be content with my Little Chief until then.

#13 4 years ago

What wax are you seeing? Is there wax where the posts were?

#14 4 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

What wax are you seeing? Is there wax where the posts were?

There is wax around, but not under, where the posts were. See the last picture from post #1.

#15 4 years ago

Use magic eraser and 91% isopropyl alcohol to get that playfield clean then Novus 2 and more Naptha before you start painting. Keep in mind you can remove some more paint if your not careful, although that may not be an issue at this point. You will need to clear coat after this to lock it down. Do you have spray equipment? What are you using for clear coat?

#16 4 years ago

If you do not have spray equipment you can use spraymax 2k. Look up the thread on it.

#17 4 years ago
Quoted from Silverstreak02:

Use magic eraser and 91% isopropyl alcohol to get that playfield clean.

Does the alcohol dissolve the wax? I've tried to get some for the last few weeks, but everyone is sold out because of the virus. I tried magic eraser and didn't have much success, but I didn't try it with the alcohol. The first picture is what I was able to do with De-Solv-It Pro and 1200 grit sandpaper. The second picture is about what it looked like when I started (the white area). You can see where I cleaned up some of the middle in the second picture, too.

Quoted from PinballAir:

If you do not have spray equipment you can use spraymax 2k. Look up the thread on it.

I have a compressor but don't have spray equipment yet - I thought about getting some, but the price on the Spraymax 2k is definitely right!

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#18 4 years ago

I would use naphtha on an old PF like that.
-mof

#19 4 years ago

The alcohol helps the magic eraser to work. It won’t do much without it. Stay away from water based cleaners.

You need a pretty big compressor to run the high volume paint gun. A normal size compressor won’t do it. I use SprayMax and have been very happy with the results. You will need multiple cans to do the job. You will also need can of two part auto clear to fill the cupped inserts. Earlier you mentioned cost is a consideration. A project of this size can get expensive pretty fast especially if you are starting from ground zero.

If you use SprayMax or 2 part auto clear you will need to buy goggles, gloves, a 3M mask and a tyvek suit. PPE is very important. This stuff is nasty.

#20 4 years ago

Check out the 2k results in the thread.
No gear to clean, fresh stock for each playfield, nothing to store.
Spray it and throw the can away.

#21 4 years ago

My volcano pf with 2k

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#22 4 years ago
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#23 4 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

My volcano pf with 2k[quoted image]

That looks awesome! I think Spraymax is going to be the way I go. I'm still trying to figure out how to get all of the wax off. One person told me that it comes off in seconds with naphtha, but that hasn't been my experience so maybe I'm doing it wrong.

Quoted from mof:

I would use naptha on an old PF like that.
-mof

How are you using the naphtha? Do you use it with a rag, a magic eraser or something else? I've used rags and wiped it down, but maybe I'm not waiting long enough. I haven't really got a great system going yet, and all of my progress has been slow. I tried Silverstreak02's method with alcohol and the magic eraser and that was promising.

#24 4 years ago

I'm not an expert on these matters, (others are) but my understanding is that naptha won't strip the clear (if there is any left) and alcohol most definitely will.

So use that idea as you go.

If I am going to be touching up and clearing the PF, perhaps I don't care about diminishing the clear coat. If I am just cleaning things up to play, perhaps I am thinking more about saving art and clear, and stick with naphtha.

My first few years in pinball, I used alcohol to clean everything, and I made some mistakes doing so for sure. I can see streaked clear on some cabinets at certain angles, and some playfield areas. Big oops. Live and learn.

-mof

#25 4 years ago
Quoted from mof:

I'm not an expert on these matters, (others are) but my understanding is that naptha won't strip the clear (if there is any left) and alcohol most definitely will.
So use that idea as you go.
If I am going to be touching up and clearing the PF, perhaps I don't care about diminishing the clear coat. If I am just cleaning things up to play, perhaps I am thinking more about saving art and clear, and stick with naptha.
My first few years in pinball, I used alcohol to clean everything, and I made some mistakes doing so for sure. I can see streaked clear on some cabinets at certain angles, and some playfield areas. Big oops. Live and learn.
-mof

He said he planned to clear the playfield and is leaning towards Spraymax

#26 4 years ago
Quoted from mof:

I'm not an expert on these matters, (others are) but my understanding is that naptha won't strip the clear (if there is any left) and alcohol most definitely will.

There isn't any clear coat on this at all, just a lot of wax that I'm still trying to remove. I do want to clear coat it after I've repainted, though.

#27 4 years ago

Use the magic eraser moistened by alcohol or naptha.
Work on small areas and clean it off often with whichever liquid you are using.
I generally use alcohol but it will remove clear on older games. I then clean up the mess with alcohol followed by naptha when alcohol dries.
The advantage to naptha is that as you are cleaning you are also removing wax and other contaminants that will cause fish eye when you spray. Also, the wet naptha will show you what the PF will look like after clearing.
The magic eraser will do most of the work for you as it is abrasive. The liquid you use will lubricate the ME and allow better cleaning of ball swirls.

Did you remove all of the adhesive?
Do you think the previous owner "sealed " the damaged areas with something?
Polyurethane?
Varethane?
It is possible that the wax you are trying to remove may be trapped under something else.

#28 4 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

Use the magic eraser moistened by alcohol or naptha.
Work on small areas and clean it off often with whichever liquid you are using.
I generally use alcohol but it will remove clear on older games. I then clean up the mess with alcohol followed by naptha when alcohol dries.
The advantage to naptha is that as you are cleaning you are also removing wax and other contaminants that will cause fish eye when you spray. Also, the wet naptha will show you what the PF will look like after clearing.
The magic eraser will do most of the work for you as it is abrasive. The liquid you use will lubricate the ME and allow better cleaning of ball swirls.
Did you remove all of the adhesive?
Do you think the previous owner "sealed " the damaged areas with something?
Polyurethane?
Varethane?
It is possible that the wax you are trying to remove may be trapped under something else.

I don't think there's anything on the board other than wax. I already spent a lot of time removing little sections of mylar. Every time I wipe any alcohol or naphtha on the board, I can see the waxy layer by the way the light reflects (not like clear coat), there's just a lot and it's getting moved around instead of just coming up. There may be some lacquer under the wax, but if so, I can't really tell. Thanks for the detailed description of your process.

I took some pictures to show the progress (or lack thereof). I've been using alcohol and the magic eraser to make a first pass and following up with a rag and naphtha. It looks hazier, but I'm still seeing ball swirls (in the 1st couple pictures). The surface still feels waxy smooth over almost all areas that I've done so far, especially in the yellow "Special When Lit" area. Am I doing it correctly? How deep should I go? I haven't seen a lot of paint on the magic eraser. My fear is that the touch up paint won't stick if I don't take it all the way down to the paint. Is that even possible, or will I always have a small amount of wax on the surface?

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1 week later
#29 4 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

It is possible that the wax you are trying to remove may be trapped under something else.

I think I may have lacquer underneath the wax because it's just not coming off with the naphtha or De-Solv-It unless I sand as well. Do you use rubbing alcohol to remove lacquer or can I leave the lacquer on before clear coating? If I don't have to remove it, I would prefer to leave it on. I wasn't sure if it would make touch-ups more difficult.

#30 4 years ago
Quoted from cbartal:

I think I may have lacquer underneath the wax because it's just not coming off with the naphtha or De-Solv-It unless I sand as well.

+1 for proper spelling of Naphtha

2 months later
#31 4 years ago

Do you have an update?

5 months later
#32 3 years ago
Quoted from Silverstreak02:

Do you have an update?

Sorry, I've been a little sidetracked since my last post on my Space Mission, but I do have an update. I repainted the cabinet this summer and the interior bottom board this week, adding a new cord because the old one was only about 3 feet long. I'm finally turning the corner of reassembling things instead of taking apart.

I cut my own stencils for the repaint, but I wasn't completely satisfied with the results so I tried to match the paint and do touch-ups. I think it looks better, but I'm not really sure what I would do differently next time because the problem I had with the stencils was that they wouldn't adhere tightly to the cabinet without damaging the base coat of off-white. There was more overspray than I wanted. Someone somewhere mentioned hitting pinball cabinets with a clear acrylic spray to protect the new paint. Does anyone have any thoughts on that? And does it help cover small paint color differences from my touch-ups or magnify them?

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1 week later
#33 3 years ago

I just cleaned my first score reel! It only took me an hour and a half. Fortunately, my Space Mission only has 16 reels and not 20. I used the advice from https://homepinballrepair.com/em-score-reels-williams/ . It was pretty helpful, but has anyone used the Teflon spray before? I wasn't sure if I actually liked using it. It made the plastic look a little cloudy even after I wiped it off a second time. I'm not sure if I think it's actually worth using. Can you tell which one I cleaned? LOL.

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#34 3 years ago

I generally only lubricate if i absolutely have to. I use superlube from a tub ( not a spray ) but i do not recommend it. I use it because i have it.
When i bought it i was told ,because it is synthetic it does not dry out. I have had the tub and the machines i used it on so long that i know this is not true. It does dry out just like regular lube.
I wonder if teflon spray would evaporate over time?

#35 3 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

I wonder if teflon spray would evaporate over time?

That's a great question. It's supposed to be a dry lube, so I'm not sure. I wondered if graphite would be a better lubricant because it's dry and definitely is a semiconductor. They use it for lubricating locks, but I assumed it would be too dirty after just cleaning the reel.

Just out of curiosity does 1 1/2 hours seem too long to clean 1 reel? Tonight I cleaned another reel (and a half), and it took me 3 hours. I'm trying to be thorough, but I'm also wondering about the post I read that recommended polishing the metal parts. I can't get all of the stains off easily, and it seems like not a great use of my time for parts that won't really ever be seen. It seems like cleaning would be as good as polishing for a score reel plate and other behind the scenes metal parts. They're not rusting. Any thoughts?

#36 3 years ago

I think polishing is up to you. When you go to sell it, most people will not notice if the metal bits are polished but they do want it to work.
For me, it depends on my mood and what i am going to do with the game over time.

I do not think 1.5 hours to 3 hours per reel is a lot if you are shining everything up. If you are looking for it to work correctly only, then that may be a longer time than necessary.

I usually work on one at a time. I disassemble it and set up a solvent bath. I spray solvent onto the parts that cannot be removed and catch it in a plastic bowl. I cut the bottom of 1 gallon plastic water jugs to make a disposable bowl. I then scrub the parts with a toothbrush to remove the crud. I dip it into the solvent that landed in the bowl. The loose parts then go into the solvent and i scrub them as well. I spend extra time wherever grease has hardened up : shafts, bores, linkages. I blow everything dry with compressed air and reassemble it.

Most times this is it and it works fine. Every so often you will find a stuborn one. I repeat the process again. If all else fails and i cannot get one to work, i lube it.
It has been my experience that in home use most mechs can work without any lube at all. I had a Gottlieb Big Brave for 10 years and my family played it nearly 3000 games and it worked well all that time and after i sold it.

#37 3 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

I do not think 1.5 hours to 3 hours per reel is a lot if you are shining everything up.

I'm glad to hear that! I got about 3 more reels done last night and today. I started the 1st player reels today, and I'm guessing they'll be the worst. It was definitely dirtier than the one I completed (2nd player reels, I think). It took even longer because I found a couple of disconnected wires that I had to re-solder. My soldering set up is not great, and I don't have a pair of "helping hands," so it took way longer than it probably should have. I figured out there's a little notch that has to line up between the gear with the electrical contacts and the actual score reel. One that I had done the other day looked lopsided, but I couldn't figure out quite why and it was bothering me~ all of the numbers and placement of the gears were lined up. I finally figured out that little notch was slightly off.

#38 3 years ago

I usually work on them until it isnt fun anymore. Then i walk away.
Its a hobby. If it becomes frustrating it is time for a break.

#39 3 years ago

I'm of German descent (among other things), and cleaning is my hobby. Lol.

#40 3 years ago

Yes me as well

#41 3 years ago

I was cleaning reel 15 out of 16 on my Space Mission, and all of the decals just came off! I started to use a Sharpie to fill it in, but decided my hand is only steady enough for touchups. Hopefully I can print off some good decals. I scanned the reel on the right, but the images aren't very clean. It's taking some time to get them nice-looking. I found a slew of Williams score and instruction printables at http://www.pinballrebel.com/pinball/cards/Williams.htm . The numbers on their reel printables aren't quite the same, but they are very close. My OCD for detail won't let me just use theirs.

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#42 3 years ago

I only use novis 1 on score reels.
The printing comes off preety easy.
Same thing with playfield apron at bottom of playfield. Its easy to accidently remove the pront on those as well.

1 week later
#43 3 years ago
Quoted from PinballAir:

Same thing with playfield apron at bottom of playfield. Its easy to accidently remove the pront on those as well.

I wondered about the apron. Thanks for the tip. Here's the upload of my new numbers on the left. I kind of wish that I had printed the "30B-7295-1" as well, but the numbers were to close to really fit it in without having the 1 and 2 on the same decal (which I decided against). I used Hayes Paper Co. A4 size Water-slide Decal Paper. This paper was pretty easy to work with, but it was slightly thick after I sprayed it with acrylic sealer. If anyone wants the Photoshop file or a PDF of the Williams score reel numbers, I'm happy to share. I think the images are fairly accurate to the font and the size. I ended up fixing the 6 after I printed mine as well as adding the 30B-7295-1 to the file.

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1 month later
#44 3 years ago

I just saw this thread and was reading thru but it jumped from playfield cleaning preparation for paint to cabinet stencils and painting.

I am also working on a Space Mission I got last year. Interested to see how you finally got the wax or lacquer stripped away or if you ever did.

I stripped my playfield top and underside and have used 99% ISO with ME and also Naphtha. Slow going and not making a lot of progress after the initial 1976 grime and dirt came off. but I just can’t seem to get down to the paint or even bare wood in the unpainted areas.

I have a lot of repainting to do and then will clear coat. Don’t want to start any of that until I’m sure I got everything off I need to.

What was your final solution?

#45 3 years ago

You can use magic eraser to clean down to the paint in bad areas since you plan on using clear coat anyway.
Look over Vids guide to ultimate playfield restoration.
If you post over there, you will get 10 different replies on what you can do and choose the one you prefer.

#46 3 years ago

Thanks for the reply @PinballAir.
I have read Vids guide and it seems like I’ve read just about every other resource and post on the subject.

My intention is to continue the long and slow process with ME but was curious what cbartal finally decided to do and what the result was since the thread sort of skipped away from the playfield to the cabinet.
Would have been nice to see an update on the playfield progress and what worked or didn’t work.

2 months later
#47 3 years ago
Quoted from Jelly429:

My intention is to continue the long and slow process with ME but was curious what cbartal finally decided to do and what the result was since the thread sort of skipped away from the playfield to the cabinet.
Would have been nice to see an update on the playfield progress and what worked or didn’t work.

Jelly429 Sorry, I've been busy with other projects and haven't had a ton of time lately. I switched to working on the cabinet and mechanical stuff due to weather. It's easier for me to paint when it's warmer outside and I can open up my basement. I never felt I totally got the playfield stripped of the clear lacquer. If I keep cleaning, it wears away the paint, too. I wish I had a good solution, but I think I'm just going to test some areas with the acrylic touch up before I go hog wild and then clear coat if the paint adheres well. I want to try some water slide decals on some of the finer artwork, but I don't know if that will work well or not.

10 months later
#48 2 years ago

@cbartal, I have been at a standstill as I took on a a deck replacement project.
Other than the occasional continuation of gradual lacquer removal. I also have a lot of dimpled up wood at the areas where the hardware post screws go in. I have been using a wood block and clamp to try to get those areas flat before trying to do any sanding or repair. Did you have any of this and have a recommendation how to get these areas flat-ish?

#49 2 years ago
Quoted from Jelly429:

cbartal, I have been at a standstill as I took on a a deck replacement project.
Other than the occasional continuation of gradual lacquer removal. I also have a lot of dimpled up wood at the areas where the hardware post screws go in. I have been using a wood block and clamp to try to get those areas flat before trying to do any sanding or repair. Did you have any of this and have a recommendation how to get these areas flat-ish?

I use the round end of a ball peen hammer several times over the course of a few days or when I think about it. After that I sand it flat and paint to match.

1 month later
#50 2 years ago

Jelly429 That's a great question. I'll be honest because I've seen this some and was debating on whether or not to even address it. The posts are going to go right back over these areas and won't even be visible and most of my areas are not too bad. I may just touch up the paint on them. The paint has been the worst part of this playfield due to drying out and flaking off. I think it may have been on someone's porch or a sheltered outside location. I'm working on the play field right now since I've overcome my fear of the airbrush. Lol. I like Silverstreak02 's idea of the ball peen hammer. I wonder if a dremel sanding disc would help or hurt more if you centered the shaft in the screw hole.

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