(Topic ID: 152667)

1935 Chicago Coin Rapid Transit (Early Ramp game)


By ZNET

3 years ago



Topic Stats

  • 25 posts
  • 7 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 3 years ago by Chrisbee
  • Topic is favorited by 3 Pinsiders

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    #1 3 years ago

    I recently acquired a 1935 CCM Rapid Transit. The five photos below, depicting the game with the legs removed and the dark patina, show my game. The three photos, showing a Rapid Transit with legs attached, are reference photos. I've included those three reference photos because they show the game's correct shooter rod housing. My game came with a broken one (actually, only the top half of the housing). Thus, I'm searching for the correct housing. Kindly send me a private message, should you happen to have for sale the correct housing for this game.

    Also, I am seeking to purchase a replacement lockdown bar, since my game is missing same. I have a vintage 1950s Exhibit lockdown bar for trade, should someone have the CCM lockdown bar and need the Exhibit one. If I do not locate the correct lockdown bar, I'll be modifying the Exhibit one to fit this game.

    I've not yet begun this restoration, apart from preserving the original instruction card, as shown in the side view photo.

    For those prewar enthusiasts not familiar with Rapid Transit, its noteworthy feature is the dual habitrails. The ramp mechanisms combine with kickers and scoring rewards in an ingenious design. I suspect that this game will require considerable tweaking to make fully operational because it's complex for this era. While there were other ramp games during the "dry cell battery years," Rapid Transit exemplified this particular feature. I find the art deco cabinet and legs as well as the colorful playfield to be very appealing. The game is listed on the IPDB, for more information.

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    #2 3 years ago

    Beautiful machine

    -Jeff

    #3 3 years ago

    That looks like an excellent player! Wow!

    #4 3 years ago
    Quoted from bingopodcast:

    That looks like an excellent player! Wow!

    Thanks, Nick. I am making progress on the restoration. The cosmetics are mostly complete. Because there are no known videos of the gameplay on the internet, to my knowledge, I plan to post a video demonstrating the action of this unusually complex prewar game.

    #5 3 years ago

    That would be excellent!

    Is your game also missing the pedestal for the tilt ball? I see the cup to the right of the slug viewer, but don't see the pedestal.

    #6 3 years ago
    Quoted from bingopodcast:

    That would be excellent!
    Is your game also missing the pedestal for the tilt ball? I see the cup to the right of the slug viewer, but don't see the pedestal.

    Yes. It's missing the pedestal for the tilt ball. If you happen to have one, please let me know. I need to locate one to purchase. Here's some photos of the progress. Note that the playfield pins have not yet been replaced. I'm going to modify the shooter housing to fit. It's a Chicago Coin housing, utilized on other CCM games. The art deco style matches the legs. Also, the beehive ball lift housing is incorrect. I'm looking for a plain one, as shown in the examples in this thread above. Any leads would be much appreciated.

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    #7 3 years ago

    Wow. This is gorgeous.

    #8 3 years ago

    How exactly does it play? Right side ball plunge. Gets to the wire form on the right. Then those balls are launched to the shooter on the lower left, only by landing a ball in 1 of 3 top ball holes?

    #9 3 years ago
    Quoted from Darcy:

    How exactly does it play? Right side ball plunge. Gets to the wire form on the right. Then those balls are launched to the shooter on the lower left, only by landing a ball in 1 of 3 top ball holes?

    The first object of Rapid Transit is to obtain a high score by landing in the "elevated" top center hole. Doing so kicks a ball into the upper left ramp, which scores 2000 per elevated ball. Eight or nine balls are lined up, when the game begins, in a row which feed into the center right kicker. That kicker, when activated by the top center hole, kicks one ball leftward and up the elevated ramp. That ball remains atop the elevated ramp. The next ball in line is now ready to be likewise kicked up onto the elevated ramp. When the game restarts, these elevated balls are dropped back to the playfield's lane, which feeds that kicker. When a ball drops into any of the 3 top holes, that ball is recycled to the ball lift.

    The second scoring objective is to land balls into trough which feeds loop ramp at the top right. Thereafter, the player will seek to land a ball into the "loop starter" holes at the top, which flank the center hole. Doing so activates the top right kicker which kicks a ball to the right "loop" ramp. There, the ball travels up to the upper right ramp and rolls down to the lower left kicker, at which point a pressure sensor kicks the ball into the lower playfield.

    The lower playfield features some high-scoring holes, including one for 3,000, one for 2,500 and one for 2,000. The singular light (covered by a red housing) illuminates when the ball lands in the "elevated" hole in the top center, which activates the "elevated ramp." There's the sound of the kicker, the sound of the rolling ball on the habitrail, and the elegant light all working in unison to entertain the player. In its day, Rapid Transit must have been like Bally's Twilight Zone, with its innovation and execution.

    The concept is nothing more than a standard bagatelle game. Nevertheless, the design of this game is somewhat unique insofar as shooting for the upper playfield holes is a function of skill whereas the lower playfield gameplay is purely a product of chance.

    This Rapid Transit is almost completely restored, both functionally and cosmetically. The power supply works well. The ramps required tweaking. Fortunately, I have 1 ball which is the proper size, enabling me to test the ramps. Online, I recently purchased correctly-sized glass marbles, which I'll utilize until I find ceramic equivalents. The game is working. I will definitely post a video soon, when the game is completely restored and when I have a full panoply of balls. The blue and yellow balls depicted in the photo below are correctly sized; however, they are rubber and don't work in this game.

    This game's design requires proper alignment so that the ball travels correctly along the guides to the ramps and clears the kick-up rounded end to the upper habitrails and, in the case of the loop, travels down to the bottom left kicker, without falling off. The top of each ramp touches the glass, so there's little room for error in adjusting the rails. I've installed new playfield pins and I've modified the ball lift and shooter assembly to fit the game. The photo below shows that progress. Since taking this photo, I've sanded and stained the patch on the cabinet's face. The only remaining tasks are to finish my lockdown bar modification (I cut down a longer one, belonging to an Exhibit woodrail) and to repaint the legs (which were solid but which required some filler here and there on the edges). I have fabricated a temporary tilt pedestal, until I find a replacement.

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    #10 3 years ago

    I have made considerable progress on this rewarding restoration project. I'm pleased to post a narrated video of the gameplay, with a detailed description of Rapid Transit's features accompanying the video. I've posted this video on both vimeo and youtube. Both links are below. The vimeo link may have slightly better resolution, so you may want to try both links, to determine which is better on your computer.

    Please be sure to click "like" and/or also comment on the video links, if you like it. Note that the lightbulb illuminates with a single pulse whenever the top center "elevated" hole is activated.

    I still have some minor restoration work (e.g. refurbish front door cosmetics, replace temporary rebound units with originals, solder arm onto lower playfield post, install correctly-sized balls, retrofit coin slide to restart game). Nevertheless, the game is functioning well and the patina shines!

    https://vimeo.com/157973182

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    #11 3 years ago

    That's mesmerizing! Thank you so much for sharing. You really found a gem. Best of luck with the rest of your restoration!

    Favorited and following,
    Ryan

    #12 3 years ago

    I'm in a hotel with poor cell and worse wifi reception, so have not been able to view the video, but will be traveling back tomorrow night. I cannot wait to see the video! Thank you very much for fixing and filming this excellent prewar.

    #13 3 years ago
    Quoted from bingopodcast:

    I'm in a hotel with poor cell and worse wifi reception, so have not been able to view the video, but will be traveling back tomorrow night. I cannot wait to see the video! Thank you very much for fixing and filming this excellent prewar.

    Nick,

    Thanks very much for announcing, on your Episode 356 podcast [http://foramusementonly.libsyn.com], the parts I'm seeking for my Rapid Transit restoration. The porcelain marbles needed for the captive, elevated habitrail feature are 7/8 inches to 15/16 inches in diameter. Anything larger may fail to travel up the ramp, as is seen on one occasion in the video demonstration. Since filming the video, I was able to buy some correctly-sized, attractive glass marbles. They work well for now. However, they are not perfectly round.

    Porcelain balls, 1 inch in diameter, work fine for the remainder of the game. I have a few of them, which I've mixed in with misc. other balls, until I find a vendor. I can certainly live without the correct ball lift and shooter housing. The game's flyer itself depicts a shooter housing different than the original one utilized on my game and also used on the other two known examples of the game. It was common for images in these old flyers to vary from the product actually produced, as you likely know.

    The shooter lane rebound assembly and the rebound rubber are not original. I do have the original lane exit rebound structure, which is depicted in the first series of photos (it looks like a paperclip secured by a rectangular plate). However, the swinging, spring steel piece could not be salvaged. Thus, I'm looking for a spring steel piece, which should be easy to find.

    #14 3 years ago

    One of the delightful aspects of Rapid Transit and a few of the other prewar games is that they were the precursors to modern pinball designs. Note that the higher value scoring holes are concentrated in the lower playfield. Thus, the player is rewarded for landing in one of the 3 loop-activation holes. However, it's necessary to first land a ball into the upper trough. Otherwise, there won't be any balls available to ride the loop. Meanwhile, the captive balls in their separate trough are awaiting a ride to the elevated habitrail, where a hefty 2,000 points is awarded for each elevated ball. There's considerable skill and strategy to this game in the upper playfield, combined with the sheer luck of the ball's trajectory in the lower playfield. Whomever designed Rapid Transit would doubtlessly have designed innovative games, if designing games with modern technology. Can you imagine what this designer would have accomplished with contemporary technology tools?

    #15 3 years ago

    Is there any chance of you bringing this to a show?

    *a-hem*York!*a-hem* ...'scuse me.

    #16 3 years ago
    Quoted from RyanClaytor:

    Is there any chance of you bringing this to a show?
    *a-hem*York!*a-hem* ...'scuse me.

    Possibly the Allentown show or to a Jersey Jack open house in Lakewood, NJ.

    #17 3 years ago

    or Texas Pinball Festival next weekennd!!

    --Jeff

    #18 3 years ago
    Quoted from way2wyrd:

    or Texas Pinball Festival next weekennd!!
    --Jeff

    My wife was raised in Plano, TX.

    #19 3 years ago

    Progress report:

    *Correctly sized balls installed (smaller balls for elevated section). These balls are glass as opposed to porcelain. They are not as round or as rugged as porcelain; however, they work perfectly and will suffice.
    *Saucer housing around the light has been repainted.
    *Elevated ramp structure has been secured to ensure a reliable route to the upper habitrail.

    A "BEFORE" & "AFTER" photo appear side-by-side below. Also, various other photos are posted here, including a photo of the game with glass installed, as it is currently positioned in the Rockola flipperless section of the prewar line-up.

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    #20 3 years ago

    What a beauty! Got to watch the video this evening. Though at first glance it appears that the bottom portion is mostly luck, it seems that a well-timed nudge would cause the ball to go above or below the pin, and would allow you to steer the ball to a good scoring hole.

    Great looking game, and it looks fantastic beside those Rockola lovlies!

    Thank you for posting!

    #21 3 years ago

    Nudging is indeed a skill, especially in the lower playfield of Rapid Transit. Of course, tilting does not disable a prewar game. Rather, a tilt ball which has fallen from its pedestal merely nullifies the winnings in the gambling parlor venue. Thanks to those who viewed this thread and accompanied me on this fun restoration. I'll likely conclude the thread by posting a photo when I've refurbished the coin door.

    1 month later
    #22 3 years ago

    I have completed this restoration. The final tasks were 1) restore the coin door cosmetics (large portions of edges were missing, including a substantial section missing stripes); 2) repair the coin slide to functionality; 3) replace the steel arm on the lower playfield. Thanks for accompanying me on this gratifying project. The game plays great!

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    #23 3 years ago

    That looks amazing!! not to mention the Army navy and Jig saw......

    --Jeff

    #24 3 years ago
    Quoted from ZNET:

    Possibly the Allentown show or to a Jersey Jack open house in Lakewood, NJ.

    Hope that you decided to bring to Allentown, would love to see this next week!

    -Stephen

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