(Topic ID: 302765)

1932 “Marble Prince” by Lundick Mfg.

By PlanetExpress

2 years ago


Topic Heartbeat

Topic Stats

  • 31 posts
  • 9 Pinsiders participating
  • Latest reply 2 years ago by OLDPINGUY
  • Topic is favorited by 8 Pinsiders

You

Linked Games

Topic Gallery

View topic image gallery

C6394258-F0DD-4897-BD18-3A6A1BC272C3 (resized).jpeg
22ED20CA-0396-4F09-BBAE-93E97BBA10CE (resized).jpeg
214E6F7B-4A5F-4D71-8FF2-28D0367C8EE1 (resized).jpeg
Bank (resized).png
20211104_185914 (resized).jpg
20211104_185919 (resized).jpg
F0DA5C08-BC34-4C8B-AA8F-B1653CED2947 (resized).jpeg
2F3F2FF2-B5A2-4067-BF72-DBA5B8C3DB12 (resized).jpeg
20210204_155244 (resized).jpg
pasted_image (resized).png
pasted_image (resized).png
pasted_image (resized).png
pasted_image (resized).png
F77A28DC-A7CA-43ED-9786-368E19CC29B0 (resized).jpeg
587E8B2A-CE6C-4ABF-81D3-D32E2CBDC3F5 (resized).jpeg
B2D0968A-E616-4B4C-AB5A-EF5F210CD0D9 (resized).jpeg
10
#1 2 years ago

Just picked up this “Marble Prince” yesterday. It does not have the manufacture’s name on it, so I’m not sure if it would have been Lundick or Lund & Esping (someone posted on YouTube that the manufacturer was Lundbeck, but I’ve not seen that anywhere else.) Since IPDP lists it as Lundick, that’s what I’m going with. https://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=5122&picno=30859

What history I know of this machine: At some point, this Marble Prince went into a cigarette and vending warehouse in Youngstown and didn’t come out again until yesterday. I purchased it his from the company founder’s nephew, who is now the owner of the cigarette vending company. The founder worked at Wiffle Board and when they closed in ‘32, bought some of their remaining machines and opened his own company. The guy I bought it from has known it to be in the warehouse for >50yrs, but didn’t know anything beyond that. (No, they don’t have any other pins, just cigarettes, pool tables and jukeboxes)

The machine is working, but filthy. I’ll try to make regular posts to this thread as I clean this rare beauty up.

90632219-1B47-4350-8C6C-69B15E876FE1 (resized).jpeg90632219-1B47-4350-8C6C-69B15E876FE1 (resized).jpegD222800E-8C89-4DEE-8CBC-FF05309E6320 (resized).jpegD222800E-8C89-4DEE-8CBC-FF05309E6320 (resized).jpeg
#2 2 years ago

Got started on the tear down today. So far, I’m only missing: the rule sheet, two screws, the shooter knob, the access door, and felt for the sides, apron and backboard.

The cabinet is stamped “597” and each of the ramp castings has “27” stamped into it. No idea how many were made in total, but I guess at least 27 and maybe as many as 597 or more.

2AA73791-7F22-4C2A-897D-8D778517EC31 (resized).jpeg2AA73791-7F22-4C2A-897D-8D778517EC31 (resized).jpegD2128AEF-DBE5-48AB-B08D-774A06355EEF (resized).jpegD2128AEF-DBE5-48AB-B08D-774A06355EEF (resized).jpeg
#3 2 years ago

Pulled the ramps to start polishing and tossed all the pins and screws into the vibratory polisher (looks like the hardware is all nickel plated, so it should polish well).

For the ramps, I’m looking to replicate the polish level I think it would have left the factory with, so a high shine, but not mirror finish and still some visible tool marks and casting imperfections.

Here is my polishing technique: Liquid Wrench and a Scotch-Brite to knock the crustier bits off. Mother’s Mag polish on 0000 steel wool to start, followed by Flitz paste on a Magic Eraser. Finally, I seal the now polished ramps with Blitz wax to keep them bright.

F83F3F8F-9B5F-4202-A227-B13269C5B2BA (resized).jpegF83F3F8F-9B5F-4202-A227-B13269C5B2BA (resized).jpeg616D7851-050F-4DC8-9474-BB82A36E2F7C (resized).jpeg616D7851-050F-4DC8-9474-BB82A36E2F7C (resized).jpeg87BA3110-B240-48E2-94DD-EF10D8385E36 (resized).jpeg87BA3110-B240-48E2-94DD-EF10D8385E36 (resized).jpegD0423433-2490-45E6-838B-02ED2CCDB130 (resized).jpegD0423433-2490-45E6-838B-02ED2CCDB130 (resized).jpeg
#4 2 years ago

Thanks for posting this. I saw it in the," what machine did you bring home today?", Thread.

When you said it had a "27" on the metal part I expected it to be cast in, not stamped, interesting. My playboy has "PB1" cast into the metal pieces. It will interesting to see what other numbers you find. I have another machine that has a serial number of 778 but can't find anything online about it.

Please ad a link to this thread in the pre-war club thread.

#5 2 years ago

A couple neat things I’ve learned so far:

I knew the ramps were cast aluminum, but hadn’t anticipated how much cast aluminum. The three main ramps alone are almost 11lbs! I have no idea how any of these survived the war effort scrap drive, since aluminum was in such demand.
AB58653B-86C4-49B8-B3CD-5B83944992DB (resized).jpegAB58653B-86C4-49B8-B3CD-5B83944992DB (resized).jpeg

It looks like the playfield is a walnut burl veneer. Should be beautiful when cleaned up (I cleaned a small patch for a preview).
5319AE56-656E-4CD8-BC55-D6C67B4FDCB8 (resized).jpeg5319AE56-656E-4CD8-BC55-D6C67B4FDCB8 (resized).jpeg

#6 2 years ago

It’s amazing how these look when cleaned up. Obviously the game play can’t compete with today’s games but still neat that any of these survived. Thanks for sharing!

#7 2 years ago

This is an easy and amazing finish for the wood and metal.

pasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).png
#8 2 years ago

What an incredible piece of art. Cant wait to see it finished!

#9 2 years ago

Wow, amazing layout! Good luck cleaning it. Should look amazing after a little elbow grease.

#10 2 years ago

up there with Radical! as having the craziest ramps in pinball

1 week later
#11 2 years ago

Progress for the week, finished the tear down. Grand total: ~15lbs of cast aluminum and >3lbs of cast brass.

First look at the underside of the playfield. Clever design, using chair casters on rotating rods to lift the playfield sections and gravity to lower them. The lifting playfield sections are bolted to this large aluminum casting. I’m really surprised they used an expensive aluminum casting and walnut veneer on the under playfield parts.
BFAC3F60-EAC3-46A0-85D8-DF8E6BBA06B0 (resized).jpegBFAC3F60-EAC3-46A0-85D8-DF8E6BBA06B0 (resized).jpeg

Two of the mounts had the veneer cut away and newspaper used to thin the part. Looks like this machine never saw much use, as the newspaper in the rotating assembly has barely worn at all. The separated veneer will be glued before reassembly.
B2D0968A-E616-4B4C-AB5A-EF5F210CD0D9 (resized).jpegB2D0968A-E616-4B4C-AB5A-EF5F210CD0D9 (resized).jpeg

Playfield with all the moving parts removed. The remaining fittings are just pinned into the playfield surface. An Eastwood polymer prybar kit comes in handy for this type of work (so much nicer than the cheap Harbor Freight ones).
587E8B2A-CE6C-4ABF-81D3-D32E2CBDC3F5 (resized).jpeg587E8B2A-CE6C-4ABF-81D3-D32E2CBDC3F5 (resized).jpeg

Down to just the empty cabinet. I’ll glue any of the separating veneer on the cab before I glue in the new felt. Playfield is weighted in the basement to get it back to perfectly flat.
F77A28DC-A7CA-43ED-9786-368E19CC29B0 (resized).jpegF77A28DC-A7CA-43ED-9786-368E19CC29B0 (resized).jpeg

#12 2 years ago

first ramps ever used in a pinball related item? maybe.

#13 2 years ago
Quoted from CaptainNeo:

first ramps ever used in a pinball related item? maybe.

That seems to be the consensus opinion, but I’ve also not seen anywhere authoritative say this definitely is the first. 1932 is pretty early, so it seems pretty likely to be the first.

#14 2 years ago

certainly more impressive than other more uhhhhhh budget ramps that came out that year.
Looking at you, goofy... https://www.ipdb.org/showpic.pl?id=1061&picno=66334&zoom=1

pasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).png
#15 2 years ago

I wonder if any inspiration came from tin toys of the 20s.

pasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).pngpasted_image (resized).png
#16 2 years ago
Quoted from OLDPINGUY:

I wonder if any inspiration came from tin toys of the 20s.[quoted image][quoted image][quoted image]

I have the coin-op version of Whirl-Shot

1965 UPI Gold Mine
20210204_155244 (resized).jpg20210204_155244 (resized).jpg

#17 2 years ago

Starting to reassemble.

Playfield weighted to get 100% flat, polished with Novus 3 & 2, then a couple coats of Blitz wax. Aluminum and brass polished with Mother’s Mag followed by Flitz and a waxing with the Renaissance wax OLDPINGUY recommended.

Very happy with how this is cleaning up!
F0DA5C08-BC34-4C8B-AA8F-B1653CED2947 (resized).jpegF0DA5C08-BC34-4C8B-AA8F-B1653CED2947 (resized).jpeg
2F3F2FF2-B5A2-4067-BF72-DBA5B8C3DB12 (resized).jpeg2F3F2FF2-B5A2-4067-BF72-DBA5B8C3DB12 (resized).jpeg

#18 2 years ago

They have a nice Marble Prince at the Pacific Pinball Museum in Alameda. Apologies for the glare on the glass.

20211104_185914 (resized).jpg20211104_185914 (resized).jpg20211104_185919 (resized).jpg20211104_185919 (resized).jpg
#19 2 years ago
Quoted from Spyder138:

They have a nice Marble Prince at the Pacific Pinball Museum in Alameda. Apologies for the glare on the glass.
[quoted image][quoted image]

Really appreciate you posting, as I’d been looking for a legible photo of the rules card. I’ve figured out that mine had felt on the apron, and the rules card must have been thrown away when the felt was removed.

The address is interesting, too. No wonder this company was short lived, building machines with expensive materials and having their office in the fanciest skyscraper in town.

Bank (resized).pngBank (resized).png
#20 2 years ago
Quoted from PlanetExpress:

Really appreciate you posting, as I’d been looking for a legible photo of the rules card. I’ve figured out that mine had felt on the apron, and the rules card must have been thrown away when the felt was removed.
The address is interesting, too. No wonder this company was short lived, building machines with expensive materials and having their office in the fanciest skyscraper in town. [quoted image]

Does the photo I posted meet your needs? I'll probably be back at the museum in a couple weeks and can try to get a better photo if it would be helpful. This happens to be one of the few machines at the museum that you cannot play, but not a problem to get more photos.

#21 2 years ago
Quoted from Spyder138:

Does the photo I posted meet your needs? I'll probably be back at the museum in a couple weeks and can try to get a better photo if it would be helpful. This happens to be one of the few machines at the museum that you cannot play, but not a problem to get more photos.

I appreciate for the offer, but the one you posted gave me what I need. Thanks! If you’re ever in central Ohio, I’ve got one you can play

10
#22 2 years ago

Still have some adjustments to finish, but it’s back together and playable. I knew this would clean up well!:

214E6F7B-4A5F-4D71-8FF2-28D0367C8EE1 (resized).jpeg214E6F7B-4A5F-4D71-8FF2-28D0367C8EE1 (resized).jpeg

I was able to get the wool felt inexpensively by buying a low cost billiards felt off Amazon. I replaced the marbles, pins (the gold plating on the originals was shot) and the leg levelers, along with making a replacement coin door. Everything else was just cleaned, polished and waxed.

I still need to replace the shooter knob with a wood knob and need to replicate a rules card, but those are small items.

Obligatory dog tax:
22ED20CA-0396-4F09-BBAE-93E97BBA10CE (resized).jpeg22ED20CA-0396-4F09-BBAE-93E97BBA10CE (resized).jpeg

#23 2 years ago

You did an Excellent Job!

#24 2 years ago
Quoted from OLDPINGUY:

You did an Excellent Job!

Thanks for your advice along the way!

#25 2 years ago

I still dont know how all the ramps can get a ball.
Are some purely decorative?

The Inlay on the "Lockdown Bar" is very sweet too!

#26 2 years ago
Quoted from OLDPINGUY:

I still dont know how all the ramps can get a ball.
Are some purely decorative?
The Inlay on the "Lockdown Bar" is very sweet too!

I’ll have to make a video when I have the playfield adjustments done. All of the ramps are possible, but to make it into the holes for the 600/1,000/500 score, you have to hit the pin and have the marble bounce back to the holes.

#27 2 years ago
Quoted from OLDPINGUY:

I still dont know how all the ramps can get a ball.
Are some purely decorative?
The Inlay on the "Lockdown Bar" is very sweet too!

thanks for the video. It's good to see something like that in action so I can realize it's not for me and stop lusting after it.
It's a very odd machine with a cool ramp and a unique ball release, but the game play doesn't seem satisfying for me, as a pre-war fan. I guess I need more ball spinning on the tracks and nudging opportunities.

EDIT: subscribed to that channel so dang hard, some great rare machines featured! Going to flip through a bunch this evening.

#28 2 years ago
Quoted from cait001:

thanks for the video. It's good to see something like that in action so I can realize it's not for me and stop lusting after it.
It's a very odd machine with a cool ramp and a unique ball release, but the game play doesn't seem satisfying for me, as a pre-war fan. I guess I need more ball spinning on the tracks and nudging opportunities.
EDIT: subscribed to that channel so dang hard, some great rare machines featured! Going to flip through a bunch this evening.

It just always looked cool in the Billboard pics, before the Net.
I looked for over 50 years, and never came across one.

Interesting that Baffle Ball succeeded in 1932, over "too many ramps"

3 months later
#29 2 years ago

Finally finished my rules card…. Thanks to Spyder138 for the photo showing the text from the Marble Price at the Pacific Pinball Museum! I just matched the fonts as close as I could in Word and printed it on a gold foil label with a color laser, but I’m super happy with the result and think it really makes the game look finished:

C6394258-F0DD-4897-BD18-3A6A1BC272C3 (resized).jpegC6394258-F0DD-4897-BD18-3A6A1BC272C3 (resized).jpeg
#30 2 years ago

At OLDPINGUY request, here’s a gameplay video…. Trying to hold the iPad steady and play the game makes for a challenge, but you get the general gameplay idea. It’s all about plunge strength, too hard and the marble jumps off the ramp, too soft and the marble goes to low scoring areas, you want just enough force to make it into the high scoring center castings.

My favorite feature is the reset. You can see at the start when I push in the coin mech that all the mustache shaped metal castings smoothly lift off the playfield, letting the marbles all run down the playfield into the trough (such a cool sound!). It took me a bit to figure out the mech: mustaches have to be set 1/8-1/4” off the playfield or they gouge the walnut burl veneer, but set one too high and the mech will bind. I finally figured out that you can suspend the playfield, then put blocks under the mustaches, then adjust the nuts on the mustache stems to align with the carriage underneath. The smoothness of the properly adjust mech is just so satisfying.

#31 2 years ago

Just Excellent!

Thank You!

I wondered how the Reset worked, Mechanically.

Reply

Wanna join the discussion? Please sign in to reply to this topic.

Hey there! Welcome to Pinside!

Donate to Pinside

Great to see you're enjoying Pinside! Did you know Pinside is able to run without any 3rd-party banners or ads, thanks to the support from our visitors? Please consider a donation to Pinside and get anext to your username to show for it! Or better yet, subscribe to Pinside+!


This page was printed from and we tried optimising it for printing. Some page elements may have been deliberately hidden.

Scan the QR code on the left to jump to the URL this document was printed from.